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Dawes Commission Townsite Map

Description: Photograph of a Dawes Commission Townsite Map Sub-Plan for Wagoner, Creek Nation, Indian Territory.
Date: August 27, 1900
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

North Main Street

Description: Photograph of a map of North Main Street, Stillwater, Oklahoma Territory. Dtl. of sheet #7, Sanborn Map Company.
Date: October 26, 1903
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8203]

Description: Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "(map drawing of the "Oklahoma City River District" from Boise City, OK in the panhandle for the flow of rivers and creeks down stream to Wilburton and Stinger, OK., Texas panhandle towns included, the legend identifies "Preciptation Station," "Complete Meteorlogocal Station," Precipitation and River Station", and "River Station," and more)"
Date: 1955
Creator: United States. Weather Bureau.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.1794]

Description: Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "(Document of "Plate No. 1" that has a drawing with it maping out the grounds.)"
Date: 1952
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.3972]

Description: Photograph used for a story in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "Four years ago, somebody asked the question, "What will traffic jams in Oklahoma City be like 20 years from now and what could we do about it?" The answer came Wednesday in a six-pound three-volume, 481 page document called OCARTS - the Oklahoma City Area Regional Transportation Study. A long-awaited meeting of officials representing over 28 governmental municipalties was called Wednesday to ushers in the document at the state capitol. The OCARTS study, prepared by Wilbur Smith and Associates, is a comprehensive plan for freeways, arterial streets, land use, parking facilities and urban development...."
Date: 1968
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8430]

Description: Photograph used for a story in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "A regional parks and open space plan recently published by the Association of Central Oklahoma Governments (ACOG) reflects area plans to spend more than $9 million on open space lands in the next five years. The plan, which extendeds through 1985, envisions a three-county network of parks, greenways and other open spaces to accomplish a variety of aims. Recreation, esthetics, historical preservation, conservation, food control, pollution control and safety are among these aims. A system of "greenways," bands of landscaped open space paralleling major highways in the metropolitan area, is proposed with several of these goals in mind. The ACOG plan document notes that one state study shows "driving for pleasure is the No. 1 recreational activity in the state, based on number of participants."......The plan suggests the greenways be developed as an integral part of the metropolitan area highway plan contained in the Oklahoma City Regional Transportation Study (OCARTS). The open space plan notes that the coupling of highway development with open space provisions is in line with "current trends toward a multiple use concept by many governmental agencies. Potential greenways recommended in the open space plan include such OCARTS plan routes as the freeway loop around Oklahoma City, parts of the West Bypass in Oklahoma City, SH 9 across Cleveland County, the U. S. 81 bypass around El Reno and others......The ACOG plan propuses hiking and biking trails along strips of open space marking the route of the famous Chisholm Trail, used in early cattle drives, across Canadian County and many persons going to the 1849 California gold rush, in Canadian and Cleveland Counties.........At present, the Oklahoma City metroplitan area has 15,915 acres of recreational park land, with 13,515 acres of its developed. The park land included …
Date: 1971
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.1796]

Description: Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "(Document of "Plate No. 2" that has a drawing with it maping out the grounds.)"
Date: 1952
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.1798]

Description: Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "(Document of "Plate No. 3" that has a drawing with it maping out the grounds.)"
Date: 1952
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.1800]

Description: Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "(Document of "Plate No. 4" that has a drawing with it maping out the grounds.)"
Date: 1952
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8560]

Description: Photograph used for a story in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "A comprehensive look at unofficial preliminary tabulations of the 1960 census for Oklahoma is contained in the following charts, graphs and statiscal reviews. County populations are traced for the entire half-century just ended. Included are gain or loss percentages for each of the state's 77 counties, for both the past decade and the 1930-60 era. County populations are traced for the entire half-century just ended. Included are gain or loss percentages for each of the state's 77 counties, for both past decade and the 1930-60 era. One table lists all cities in Oklahoma currently credited with populations of 5,000 or more. beginning with Oklahoma City in No. 1 spot, these cities are ranked numerically according to size. Cities in the over-5,000 class for the first time are Del City, Warr Acres, Broken Arrow, Pyror, Tahlequah and Guymon. These Figures are expected to change when final results are tabulated. Muskogee, long one of Oklahoma's top cities in size, showed a slight gain for the 10-year period but dropped from third to sixth palce among the top 10, being edged out by Lawton, Norman and Enid. Midwest City is No. 7, followed by Bartlesville, Ponca City and Shawnee. At least one suburbam Oklahoma City of appreciable size was not even listed in the 1950 census. It is The Village, which grew from an open field to a city of 12,126 residents in 10 years."
Date: 1960
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Beals Printers

Description: Photograph of map of Oklahoma Counties. Photo taken by Meyers Photo Shop for the Beals Printers Acct.
Date: unknown
Creator: Meyers Photo Shop
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society
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