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Group photo (1943)

Description: Photograph of 24 members of the Shawnee FD lined up in three rows in front of fire trucks. A black and white dog also appears in the photo. Names are on the back of the photo. Photo date: 1943.
Date: 1943
Partner: Oklahoma State Firefighters Museum

Gully Damaged Caused By Unprotected Terrace Outlet Channel

Description: Photograph of an UNIDENTIFED man standing in a gully caused by unprotected terrace outlet. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Gully along fence row is the result of unprotected terrace outlet channel and will be sloped and sodded to Bermuda for erosion control. Terraces will be extended across channel to divert all runoff out of gully & into adjoining pasture and the fence will be relocated.”
Date: November 11, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

G. G. Gross Cover Drilling and Vetch Plowing in Pecan Orchard

Description: Photograph of G. G. Goss on a tractor drilling cover and soil improving crop of vetch in a 26-acre pecan orchard. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Drilling cover and soil improving crop of Vetch in a 26 acre Pecan Orchard. In the same operation, Goss is applying 100# super phosphate per acre. Nimrod Fine Sand.”
Date: October 7, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Earl Tucker Harvesting Mung Bean Field

Description: Photograph of Harold Welsh and Earl Tucker harvesting Tucker’s mung bean crop. People shown in photo go as followed from left to right: 1.Earl Tucker, 2. Harold Walsh. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Harvesting mung bean crop planted 20# per acre, June 1, 1943. Farm Planner Harold Welsh and Earl Tucker (left) farm owner, examine the crop. One field yielded 400# per acre and average yield on entire 30 acres is 312# to 315# per acre. The beans are following barley destroyed by green bugs and Tucker says he will follow the beans with wheat for pasture. “I have heard much about the soil improving qualities of mung beans” he said, “and I hope to work out a rotation with wheat.” The beans are selling at $.0.05 per pound.”
Date: August 19, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Soil Improving Korean Lespedeza

Description: Photograph of Carl Chastain kneeling in a field of soil improving Korean Lespedeza. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Carl Chastain in Korean Lespedeza utilized for soil improvement. This is the first year Korean Lespedeza has been used here and Chastain said “Where the oats and wheat were seeded with the Lespedeza the small grain grew 6” to 8” higher than in the other field.”
Date: November 10, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

G. C. Gardner and Ralph Shaver Standing in Shaver’s Four-Acre Field of Sweetclover That Yielded 300 Pounds of Seed

Description: Photograph of G. C. Gardner and Ralph Shaver standing in Shaver’s four-acre field of sweetclover that yielded 300 pounds of seed. People shown in photo go as followed from left to right: 1. G. C. Gardner, 2. Ralph Shaver. The back of the photograph proclaims, “4 Acre Field of Sweet Clover that yielded 300 lbs. of seed. G. C. Gardner, left and Ralph Shaver in the picture. Shaver says he has planted corn after sweet clover and experienced yield of 15 bushels more per acre than where clover was not grown. On another 7 acre sweet clover field where District Supervisor Shaver pastured 70 head of hogs for 3 months after shaver had pastured 2 milk cows from April 15 to October 15 October.”
Date: November 9, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

UNIDENTIFED Man Kneeling in a Field of Trashy Tillage, in Contrast to the Left Field, Which has Wheat Stubble

Description: Photograph of an UNIDENTIFED man kneeling in a field of trashy tillage, in contrast to the left field, which has wheat stubble. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Trashy tillage (right) contrasted with wheat stubble turned under (left) on same field. Wheat was failure on entire field due to green bug infestation. One-Way plow was used for trashy tillage, and moldboard plow was used to turn under stubble on left.”
Date: August 19, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

R.T. Douglas on his Post Flooded Field

Description: Photograph of R. T. Douglas and his field. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Pig weeds grow on fertile land where I planted corn twice this year,” says R. T. Douglas. “My fist planting washed out and the second planting had just started growing when this field was flooded a second time, I’ve got about 75 acres on which there will be a total crop loss this year. If my new drainage system had been completed in time I expect I’d have made 40 bushels of corner per acre here from the first planting.”
Date: July 15, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Fame Drainage Project, Grader Constructed, Two-Mile Long Drainage Ditch

Description: Photograph of Rt. Abbie Busha and Katie Fisher standing in a two-mile long drainage ditch, constructed via grader, for the disposal of excess surface water for over twenty-one farms in the area. This benefits 1790 acres, while the excess surface water drains into the North Canadian River. People shown in photo go as followed from left to right: 1. Rt. Abbie Busha, 2. Katie Fisher. The back of the photograph proclaims, “2 Mile long, grader constructed, drainage ditch for disposal of excess surface water. Ditch empties into natural drain hence into North Canadian River. This is part of the new drainage system in Fame Drainage Project that benefits 1790 acres (90% in cultivation) on 21 farms. Combined length of ditches 2,175 linear yards.”
Date: February 4, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Two UNIDENTIFED Men Surveying the Huey-McNair Project Drainage Ditch

Description: Photograph of two UNIDENTIFED men, one of them looking upstream, surveying the drainage ditch known as the Huey-McNair Project. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Looking upstream along drainage ditch known as Huey-McNair Project. Rod shows depth in this 9 foot cut. Side slopes are 2-1, the bottom width is 3 feet. Road on right will be graded down by Parish. Ditch crosses road in the background.”
Date: May 15, 1943
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Marge Guiglardi Irrigated Farm Pasture

Description: Photograph of Guiglardi examining some alfalfa on his irrigated farm where new borders have been established according to plans made with the assistance of the Soil Conservation Service technician assigned to the district. The back of the photograph proclaims, “Photograph of Mr. Guiglardi examines some of the alfalfa on his irrigated farm where new borders have been established according to plans made with the assistance of the Soil Conservation Service technician assigned to the district. Note the contrast between the irrigated valley land in the foreground and the sand hills in the far background. Flood waters from these sand hills frequently do serious damage to the fertile productive valley lands. In 1941, a flood from the sand hills severely damaged an 8-acre field on this farm. Four acres were deeply sanded and four additional acres were damaged severely. With the assistance of the Soil Conservation Service, owner leveled the land, changed the rows, and in 1942 produced an average of two bales of cotton to the acre. It was the best production he had ever made on the 8 acres. Without this work, the land would have produced nothing in 1942.”
Date: March 30, 1943
Creator: Webb, C. G.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Water Conservation; Water Erosion; Flooding and Prevention

Description: Photograph of Harry N. Chambers, OK State Conservationist is shown with his foot on top of fence post nearly buried in sand and silt deposited during the record breaking floods along the Canadian River between May 10 and May 26, 1943. From lands shown in the background were once operated as a nursery by the Soil Conservation Service. OK-8538.
Date: May 30, 1943
Creator: Hammett, J.W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Water Conservation; Water Erosion; Flooding and Prevention

Description: Photograph of furniture in front of the W. H. Stubbs home. During recent flood, water was approximately 3 feet deep in the house. Stubbs’ loss was listed as follows: crops destroyed: 20 acres of sweet corn, 80 acres of filed corn, 15 acres of green beans, 10 acres of spinach, 9 acres of sweet potatoes, 2 acres of cantaloupes and watermelons. Livestock lost: 29 hogs and pigs, 2 cows, and 2 horses. Also lost includes $350 worth of seed, 540 gallons of gasoline for the tractor, 50 gallons of motor oil, 1 planter, 1 cultivator, 1 section harrow. An irrigation system costing $600 to replace was also destroyed. Residence damage was $1200. The furniture damage was $1500. OK-8531.
Date: May 30, 1943
Creator: Hammett, J.W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Water Conservation; Water Erosion; Flooding and Prevention

Description: Photograph of Clarence Dye, aged 10, fishing off a culvert on Hwy 64 following recent record-breaking floods. This drainage-way is ordinarily dry. With flood water still on a part of his land, Mr. W. L. Cotner is seen in the background with his team replanting the 100 acres of corn, cotton, and vegetables destroyed when the levee broke. determined to produce his share of war crops this year, he returned to the field the first day possible--Memorial Day Sunday [when Memorial Day was celebrated on May 30, from 1868 to 1970]. OK-8526.
Date: May 30, 1943
Creator: Hammett, J.W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Water Conservation; Water Erosion; Flooding and Prevention

Description: Photograph of the temporary repair in the levee of a drainage ditch that was clogged with silt and sand washed from the adjoining farm land during a recent heavy rains, contributed to record-breaking floods in OK and AR. The levee broke in four places. Joe Preston, administrative assistant, State Soil Conservation Committee is standing on the repaired break. In the center foreground H. M. Chambers, State Conservationist for the Soil Conservation Service, stands near the bottom of the ditch which has now silted up to a level above fields is seen in the background. OK-8524.
Date: May 30, 1943
Creator: Hammett, J.W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Water Conservation; Water Erosion; Flooding and Prevention

Description: Photograph of a Bay City crane placing a key wall for the support of riprap. The crane is working on berm at elevation 934.0. Note the depth of the trench for the key wall and the size of the rock. This view was taken at Station 28 of Lake Carl Blackwell, in Stillwater. OK-8485.
Date: February 18, 1943
Creator: Blackert, F. E.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society

Grass, Legume and Forb Cultivation

Description: Photograph of two acre Bermuda grass pasture strip developed from a badly gullied draw. The draw was sloped and sodded in 1938 and now provides grazing at the rate of 1 unit per acre and serves as an outlet channel for 70 acres of terraced and cultivated land. Mr. Fred Bunch states that this pasture strip furnishes better grazing than any of his 28 acres of native pasture on this 160 acre farm. He also states that his soil conservation practices have increased by $1,000 the value of this farm. Terraces were built with the assistance of the old Sentinel Civilian Conservation Corps [CCC] Camp. OK-8467. Meadow development. In the spring of 1940 this 60 acre abandoned, cultivated field was planted to sericea lespedeza. There was formerly a shoulder deep gully where the man I standing and numerous smaller ones covered the area. This year Mr. George Stainer has made one cutting for hay that yielded a ton per acre. It has been heavily grazed since then and another hay crop could be cut immediately (the estimated yield is 1 ton per acre). OK-8628.
Date: September 25, 1943
Creator: Jenkins, E. W.
Partner: Oklahoma Conservation Historical Society
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