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"Practically a Military School": The University of Oklahoma and World War I

Description: Article detailing the University of Oklahoma's reaction and response to the declaration of World War I in 1917. This includes the University of Oklahoma's administration, faculty, and students' actions to support the war effort. The revamped campus included barracks and military-training facilities. A Student Army Training Corps, precursor to ROTC, was born, and numerous students and faculty entered the armed services.
Date: Summer 2006
Creator: Levy, David W.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Earning Their Spurs in the Oil Patch: The Cinematic FBI, the Osage Murders, and the Test of the American West

Description: This article covers the Osage Murders, a series of murders occurring in Osage county in the early 1920s where victims were members of the Osage Tribe who all held rights that entitled them to oil royalties. The murders were eventually solved and later used to promote the Federal Bureau of Investigation, even being used as the basis for multiple books and movies.
Date: Summer 2006
Creator: Warren, Andrew L.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Money Matters: The Stamp Scrip Movement in Depression-Era Oklahoma

Description: Article expanding on the previous 2004 article on Oklahoma's reaction to the depression era banking crisis of early 1933. In this article, Gatch ties the origin of the scrip movement to the writings of Yale University's professor Irving Fisher and traces the implementation of scrip schemes in nearly three dozen Oklahoma towns and explains the reasons for scrip's early success and rapid demise.
Date: Autumn 2006
Creator: Gatch, Loren
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

A Reading Room of Their Own: Library Services for African Americans in Oklahoma, 1907-1946

Description: Article discussing the struggles African American Oklahomans faced for access to public library services. The first forty years of statehood brought a few successes, and by mid-century only eleven communities provided a public library facility for the state's black citizens.
Date: Autumn 2006
Creator: Cassity, R. O. Joe, Jr.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Forty Feet Under: Kaw City and the Kaw Project on the Arkansas River, 1957-1976

Description: Article describing the process of the construction of the Kaw Dam and Reservoir. From the mid-1950s the inhabitants of Kaw City, founded in 1902 in Kay County, anticipated the construction of Kaw Dam and Reservoir on the Arkansas River. As the bureaucratic process dragged on for decades, the project divided the community. Ultimately, the residents rebuilt on a new site, and by 1977 "Old" Kaw City lay forty feet under Kaw Lake.
Date: Winter 2006
Creator: Lowitt, Richard
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Sooner State Civil Liberties in Perilous Times, 1940-1941, Part 1: The Oklahoma Federation for Constitutional Rights

Description: The first part of this two-part article examines citizen action in Oklahoma initiated in the fall of 1940 by the creation of the Oklahoma Federation of Constitutional Rights to preserve and defend freedom of speech, which later faced investigation by the legislature.
Date: Winter 2006
Creator: Wiegand, Wayne A. & Wiegand, Shirley A.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

A Meeting of Conquerors: Art Goebel and Charles Lindbergh in Tulsa, 1927

Description: Article recounts the meeting of Art Gobel and Charles A. Lindbergh in Tulsa in September 1927. Both aviators, Goebel was known as "The Conqueror of the Pacific," while Lindbergh was "The Conqueror of the Atlantic." Their meeting and behavior toward Oklahomans revealed much about each man's character and personality and about the American practice of hero making.
Date: Spring 2007
Creator: Hedglen, Thomas
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

A Reluctant Heir: Carl Albert, Watergate, and the American Presidency

Description: Article details Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Carl Bert Albert's decision to eschew the ultimate leadership role and recommend Rep. Gerald R. Ford as Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's successor after Agnew resigned in disgrace in 1973.
Date: Autumn 2007
Creator: Anderson, Heath
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Thrice Purchased: Acquisition and Allotment of the Citizen Potawatomi Reservation

Description: Article explores the arrival of the Potawatomi in central Oklahoma after being pushed out of their communally held Kansas reserve and into the Indian Territory, the acquisition of a new reservation, and the means used to force them to own land as individuals.
Date: Spring 2008
Creator: Kraft, Lisa
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma's Air Ace: William T. Ponder and World War I

Description: This article chronicles William T. Ponder's training and testing in battle against the backdrop of World War I aviation history. Ponder served with the French Aviation Service as part of the Lafayette Flying Corps and the U.S. Air Service where he became Oklahoma's first aviation war hero.
Date: Summer 2008
Creator: Moore, Bill
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

William Meredith Cunningham: An Oklahoma Proletariat Novelist

Description: Article presents a biography of William Cunnigham and reveals the ways in which his novels, poetry, and other writings championed the industrial-agricultural working class of his native state of Oklahoma.
Date: Autumn 2008
Creator: O'Dell, Larry
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

"Among the Indians: The Peace at Muscogee."

Description: Transcription of an article regarding a meeting about territorial government for Native Americans and citizenship. The article also discusses each of the commissioners present at the meeting, speeches, and various events.
Date: unknown
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Transcontinental Crossroads: Oklahoma's Lighted Airways in the 1930s

Description: Article describes how Oklahoma became a crossroads in the coast-to-coast lighted airmail delivery system in the 1930s and the social, technological, and cultural developments that accompanied this advancement.
Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Wikle, Thomas A.
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Forgotten Hero: Oklahoma Naval Commander Ernest E. Evans's Gallant Sacrifice at Leyte Gulf

Description: Article explores the question of why Commander Ernest E. Evans's memory is virtually forgotten in his native state while so honored by the U.S. Navy. Evans, an Oklahoma native, bravely fought and died in the Battle of Leyte Gulf in World War II, earning multiple honors for his heroism.
Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Floyd, Larry
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Chitto Harjo and the Snake Rebellion

Description: This article compares newspapers in Oklahoma to newspapers nationwide to discover the impact of the Snake Rebellion, led by Chitto Harjo.
Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Jones, Leslie
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Fred Harris's New Populism and the Demise of Heartland Liberalism

Description: Article uses the failure of Oklahoma Democrat Fred Harris's New Populism to show twentieth century liberalism's accommodation of corporate power as well as the racial climate of the 1970s.
Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Bloodworth, Jeff
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Notes and Documents, Chronicles of Oklahoma, Volume 88, Number 2, Summer 2010

Description: Notes and Document section from Volume 88, Number 2, Summer 2010. It includes "Oklahoma Historians Hall of Fame," an article honoring the individuals who were inducted into the annual Oklahoma Historians Hall of Fame in 2010. The honorees included Currie Ballard, Bob Burke, General Thomas P. Stafford, and Dr. Lewis Stiles. It also includes "Alva, Oklahoma: What's in a Name?" an article examining the naming of the town of Alva, Oklahoma, to determine whether it was named for the railroad attorney Alva Adams. Finally, it includes "Oklahoma Newspaper Project," which details the Oklahoma Historical Society's partnership with the University of North Texas and the Oklahoma Press Association to digitize newspapers that reflect Oklahoma's history.
Date: Summer 2010
Creator: Baxter, Elizabeth M.; Reichenberger, Donovan & Jerome, Angela
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society

Broken Thread: The Choctaw Spinning Association, 1937-1943

Description: This article details the process of reinstituting the art of spinning wool among the Choctaw as part of a project led by the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the Bureau of Indian Affairs to increase the income of Choctaw women through traditional native craft and analyzes the program's unfortunate demise.
Date: Winter 2008
Creator: Petty, Christina
Partner: Oklahoma Historical Society
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