This system will be undergoing maintenance on April 12 between 8:00AM and 11:00AM CDT.

Cherokee County Democrat (Tahlequah, Okla.), Vol. 27, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 25, 1913 Page: 1 of 8

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: Oklahoma Digital Newspaper Program and was provided to The Gateway to Oklahoma History by the Oklahoma Historical Society.

View a full description of this newspaper.

WE WISH Y O .U , A= M E R R Y CHRISTMAS AND A PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR
,,,v
Y
<
CHEROKEE
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY AND COUNTY
Successor to The Tahlequah Arrow and Herald
DEMOCRAT
PUBLISHED BY THE ARROW PUBLISHiNG CO.
TAHLEQUAH, OKLA., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25. 1913
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR—NUMBER 15
, i
PATHOS AND JOY AT
CHRISTMAS TIMJB IN
SOLDIERS' HOMKs
Christinas fa as pathetic r. h
it !« loyous to many of the old
Confederate veterans who, by
fate and circumstances, are
forced to depend entirely upon
the generosity of their com-
rades and friends who have
prospered since the war. There
are no pensions for these old
soldiers except the meager
sums they get from the var-
ious states. Some of the vet-
erans are dependent on these
tnsignlflcent funds to keep
them out of the poorhouse.
The fiftieth anniversary of
the battle of Gettysburg was
celebrated last July. The twen-
ty-year-old boy of this battle
is now a gray haired veteran
of seventy. The old soldiers
are crossing the great divide
by the score, and before many
years have passed (here will bo
few left.
About twenty years ago it
was discovered that many of
the bravest soldiers of the war
were drifting to the poor-
houses because there was no-
whjro else for them to go and
because their wounds kept
them from work. Many had
no relatives, and the relatives
of others were too poor to
support the old soldiers. In
many cases the veterans de-
clined to accept alms. The
movement to take care of these
men resulted in Confederate
homes in all of the southern
states, and descendants of the
men wno wore gray now spend
about 12,000,000 annually in
pensions and In the support of
various homes.
Christmas is a happy reality
in these institutions. Although,
iwing to the slender incomes,
the homes have to run on the
most modest basis, there is no
skimping at Christmas time.
From the neighborhood around
come turkeys and chickens and
pies and biscuits and fruit arid
cakes and tobacco in plenty--
everything except wines and
liquors, for the rules against
alcohol in these Institutions
are particularly strict. And on
Christmas day the reitives and
friends and acquaintances
crowd to the homes with all
fcorts of presents and with good
wishes for the ofd fellows, who
recall their fights for the lost
cause with pride in what they
did and with satisfaction lor
the preservation of the Union.
You will hear some one say:
"That old fellow over there,
with ono eye and one leg, was
the most brilliant young man
in our town. He belonged to
the richest family in the coun-
ty. But the war took the
wealth, and he lost the eye
and the leg in the Wilderness,
and a bullet in his head ruin-
ed his mind for life. All his
people are dead, and only the
t'uw of us who were with him
know what a brave man he
was. I left my family today
to come out here and bring ;>
box of cigars and talk a little
over old times to let him know
that he is not entirely for
gotten."
Tho beat thing about it Is«
that the old fellows are al-
ways disposed to do full jus-
tice to the offerings of the
day, and to look their best In
th<Vr gray uniforms, and to
tell their choicest stories, and
to eat the most.
ORIGIN OF THK YULE I .(Hi.
The Yule log in England is a
relic of druldism. Its njtme
is believed to be a corruption
of the wheel log, a wlusel in
druldical symbolism typifying
he march of the sun. The
lightning of the Yule fire Is
reminiscent of the sacred fires
kindled by the drulds at mid-
winter In the round towers
which yet remain in many
parts of Great Britain, Ire-
land, Franc* and Spalp.
4TM\
Vfl
-
'i'vV *€
IffMJ*
ISP/'® •
I ■( V'/';; '
•><W*
• JUT- It
...
IV FRENCH CHURCHES.
In Paris Christmas day l.<
kept as a religious festival, and
many wo never dream of go-
ins to church on any other
day In the year make it a point
of attending mass on le Jour
de Noel, and the blaze of the
tapers falls on crowded con-
gregatlons, men, women and
ohlldren, kneeling, sitting and
standing In the wide area of
tho Madeleine and Notre
Dame.
Midnight mass is held on
Christmas eve. A waxen Im-
age of the infant Savior lies
upon a little hutch of real
straw In a cave built of min-
iature stones. The Virgin
mother kneels over tho child,
and to quote a verso from one
of tho quaintest old carols
St. Joseph, too, Is near to
guard tho child,
To watch him and protect his
mother mild.
Often the tlirefe wise men
are added, bearing offerings In
their hands.
LITTLE WAIFS ENJOY
THE YULETIRE SEASON
To thousands of children in
our great cities are denied the
joys of attending the Christ-
mas festivities that those who
have pleasant homes and par-
ents in comfortable circum-
stances enjoy. Uut because
the home surroundings are
lacking one must not jump to
the conclusion that the chil-
dren of the unfortunates and
the waifs who are parentless
or have been driven from
home by drunkoa and Inhu-
man parents dc not have the.ir
Santa Claus and the other
pleasures that make Christ
mas the joy and delight o;'
childhood the world over.
If one were inclined to be
lleve that Christmas outside
the homo circle is devoid of
all that brings pleasure and
happiness to the child he
should visit one of the great
institutions where the children
of the poor and homeless are
provided with the comforts of
life by the city and the contri-
butions of the charitable.
In these homes are housed
hundreds and hundreds of
children, .'ew of them ovei
ten years o? age. Hero one
will seo -luring the Christmas
gayetlea a f>cene of happiness
that will make him wish him-
sejf a child once again and
enter into the spirit of the op
caslon with the same joyous-
ness and enthusiasm as do
those he Is watching. It is
possible that he might even
realize that the presencee of
so many children enjoying
Christmas together under one
roof is a thousand times to be
preferred to the sight of one
lonely child of the rich play-
ing alone with its toys, with
no one but the nurse to look
on.
FIRST CHRISTAMS FEAST.
The first feast to be cele
brated on Dec. 25 was estab-
lished by Commodus, emperoi
of Roree, who reigned about
185 years after the birth of
Christ. After that there are
many references in history to
meetings of the new sect call-
ed Christmas, who gathered
on this day to celebrate the
birth of the God-man. It is
not until a century after the
time of Commodus that we
find a particular reference to
tho persecutions that the
Christians underwent at the
hands of the pagan emperors,
culminating in a Christmas day
massacre.
When Rome was no longer
a pagan state the feast began
to be celebrated In Christian
style, and those who observed
the birth of Christ in those
days did so in widely separated
countries and frequently at
widely different periods of
. '.Ime and according to no set
program. The ancients agreed
on one thing, however--that
the festival conunenior.itln
the birth of Christ should he
the most magnificent of the
year. Iu soma cases !t van
kept up for days.

Upcoming Pages

Here’s what’s next.

upcoming item: 2 2 of 8
upcoming item: 3 3 of 8
upcoming item: 4 4 of 8
upcoming item: 5 5 of 8

Show all pages in this issue.

This issue can be searched. Note: Results may vary based on the legibility of text within the document.

Tools / Downloads

Get a copy of this page .

Citing and Sharing

Basic information for referencing this web page. We also provide extended guidance on usage rights, references, copying or embedding.

Reference the current page of this Newspaper.

Cherokee County Democrat (Tahlequah, Okla.), Vol. 27, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 25, 1913, newspaper, December 25, 1913; Tahlequah, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc90259/m1/1/ocr/: accessed April 10, 2021), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

Univesal Viewer

International Image Interoperability Framework (This Page)