[Photograph 2012.201.B0052.0713]

Description

Photograph taken for a story in the Oklahoma City Times newspaper. Caption: "A Crumpled newspaper bag and master carrier's jacket hang limp in a closet. A broken motor scooter has been put out of sight. There's an empty desk in room 304 at Central high school. And a grief-stricken father and mother must decide what they'll do with a steadily growing college fund. These were the tragic reminders Thursday that Jimmy Dutton was not an ordinary boy. He was a hard-working, dependable youth, and he wanted to go to college. JIMMY's dreams of college and a new car were crushed ... continued below

Physical Description

1 photograph

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. February 14, 1957.

Context

This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection and was provided by Oklahoma Historical Society to The Gateway to Oklahoma History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 48 times . More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

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Oklahoma Historical Society

In 1893, members of the Oklahoma Territory Press Association formed the Oklahoma Historical Society to keep a detailed record of Oklahoma history and preserve it for future generations. The Oklahoma History Center opened in 2005, and operates in Oklahoma City.

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Description

Photograph taken for a story in the Oklahoma City Times newspaper. Caption: "A Crumpled newspaper bag and master carrier's jacket hang limp in a closet. A broken motor scooter has been put out of sight. There's an empty desk in room 304 at Central high school. And a grief-stricken father and mother must decide what they'll do with a steadily growing college fund. These were the tragic reminders Thursday that Jimmy Dutton was not an ordinary boy. He was a hard-working, dependable youth, and he wanted to go to college. JIMMY's dreams of college and a new car were crushed Thursday-as broken as were his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Dutton, the dozens of friends along his paper route and his classmates at Central high school. Fifteen-year-old James William Dutton was buried Thursday afternoon in Memorial cemetery. His parents will take the money collected by friends and use to toward the marker they'll place on their boys grave. Jimmy died Tuesday night when his motor scooter crashed into the side of a taxi-cab at NW 10 and Classen. WEDNESDAY morning, Jimmy's homeroom teacher, Doris Taylor, welcomed her 31 other students for their daily homeroom session in room 304 at Central high school. "I've never seen a more broken group," she said. "They all told me they've never had an experience like this one before." Within one minute, Jimmy's classmates had collected $7 to pay for flowers. Most of the pupils gave their lunch money. Thursday, the group forgot about a Valentine party which was planned, Instead, they made plans to attend in a group their friend's funeral, to be at 2 p.m. Thursday in Guardian funeral home. FOLKS LIVING along Jimmy's paper route in the 2600 block along NW 46, 47, and 49, and along Linn, Detroit and Pate, heard the news early Wednesday, Mothers left their chores to call on others along the route and take up a collection for Jimmy. Children gathered in little knots to talk about the friendly carrier boy. The customers Jimmy served so well collected $50 to send his parents along with a note they'll always treasure. It reads. "Each person in Jimmy's route has always deeply appreciated and admired him for all he typified-his friendship, courtesy, dependability and wonderful consideration for us and all our children. His death is a deep personal tragedy to each of us and even more to every child in the neighborhood. We would all be proud to have had him for our son." It was signed by 76 families. TWELVE-YEAR-OLD Terry Tatum, of 4929 N Pate, idolized Jimmy because "he let me ride his motor scooter "round the block." Terry helped the older boy throw his papers, and he was sort of learning the job from Jimmy. Jimmy's paper bag and the master carrier jacket he earned at the last recognition dinner held by Oklahoma-Times circulation department in December was hung in his closet. His parents, of 3137 NW 44, think they'll keep Jimmy's jacket, but Dutton said "We'll probably give his bag to R.L." R. L. Stiles is Jimmy's closet friend. "THEY TRADED scooters when one wasn't working, and they helped each other throw their routes." Dutton said. The boy had carried the Oklahoman and Times for about 11/2 years. He was saving his money for college. Jimmy was born in Wesley hospital, and lived here all his life. He attended Mayfair elementary school and Harding junior highschool. He transferred to Central this year , because he wanted to get into Central's automobile mechanics class. "He liked to fool around with car motors,"his father said. Jimmy, a sophomore at Central, was highly popular with his classmates. He never caused teachers any trouble, and he was described as a better than average student. FRIENDS at Central saw to it Thursday that the Cardinal yearbook staff will go ahead and publish his picture. Then they'll give a copy of the annual to his parents when it comes out in the spring. Jimmy was a first class Scout and was working toward his Eagle rank. He was a member of troop 66. He had an almost perfect attendance record at Downtown Baptist church, He rarely missed Sunday school, youth gatherings. His pastor, W. E. Cook perched Jimmy's funeral Thursday."

Physical Description

1 photograph

Notes

Credit: Oklahoma City Times

Subjects

Source

  • Oklahoma City Times, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,

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Identifier

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Collections

This photograph is part of the following collection of related materials.

Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection

The Oklahoma Publishing Company, the parent company of many prominent Oklahoma newspapers, amassed a significant collection of photographs that span more than a century. The wide variety of photographs accompanied stories in the newspapers.

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Creation Date

  • February 14, 1957

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Coverage Date

Added to The The Gateway to Oklahoma History

  • Oct. 11, 2013, 8:30 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 2, 2013, 1:25 p.m.

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Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 2
Total Uses: 48

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[Photograph 2012.201.B0052.0713], photograph, February 14, 1957; (gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc202068/: accessed December 16, 2018), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.