Ellis County Capital (Arnett, Okla.), Vol. 11, No. 3, Ed. 1 Friday, July 18, 1919 Page: 2 of 8

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ELLIS COUNTY CAPITAL ARNETT OKLAHOMA
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Negligees From the Orient
I SAVE LABOn in
GR0WIII6 BEETS I
CULTIVATION NEEDED
IN CORN PRODUCTION
Use of More Horses and Larger
Implements Reduces Work
of Farm Laborers ’
I Object Is to Promote Early
Growth and Development
THE MAKING OF
A FAMOUS
MEDICINE
COUPAKESOH Of R0W CREWS
Methods Will Vary to Meet Require
merits of Planting— Prevent Weeda
From Robbing Soil of Mols
turs and Fertility
How Lydia E Pinkliam’a
Vegetable Compound
1$ Prepared For
Woman's Use
Approximately One Hour an Acre
Lest of Man Labor Is Necessary
to Operate Plow Drawn by
Three Horses Than by Two
In whatever corner of the world It
flourishes a graceful colorful dress Is
meat for the designers of negligees
They seize upon it and use it as it
Is or interpret it to suit themselves
In fabrics that they have at hand
Beautiful Japanese and Chinese gar-
ments are bought In their native coun-
tries and sold to Americans to wear
as they are Who would think of
taking the liberty of changing any-
thing so exquisite? Not all of them
blossom only in the privacy of homes
for splendid mandarin conts challenge
comparison with the handsomest eve-
ning wraps One thing that entices
the buyer of fine Japanese and Chi-
nese garments is the stability of their
styles They are and were and will
be good
It is not necessary to attempt a de-
scription of the wonderful kimono
shown at the right of the two figures
pictured above This enfolding dress
Is simply a graceful background of
soft silk for rich embroideries of the
iris and wisteria blossoms that are so
dear to the Japanese On a light
gray ground in natural colorings they
make the kimono a thing of beauty
and a joy forever
The pretty negligee at the left f the
figure Is In two pieces au underdress
with long flaring sleeves all made of
lace and an over garment that forms
a short cape at the back wltfi a front
of three overlapping panels It is
made of satin and embellished with
embroidery Wherever It was design'
ed it may lay claim to both ingenuity
and beauty
Wide laces — flouncing laces they are
called— make the way of the designer
easy and are used in many negligees
Over underslips of silk they form long
loose- coats Crepe-de-chine or fine
mercerized cotton goods are used with
them the laces in cream color and
the other fabrics In gay flowerlike
tints and colors All are washable
and very often narrow ribbons and lit-
tle flowers of ribbon or chiffon add an-
other charm to them The story of
negligees cannot be complete without
reference to the beautiful tnlTeta conts
In light colors to be worn over lace
petticoats
Good-Looking Work-a-Day Dresses
(Prepared by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
Many farmers ore solving the labor
problem by using larger Implements
and more horses Such practices have
enabled sugar-beet growers greatly to
reduce their expenses for man labor
unci Increase tlielr operations The
normal man labor required in growing
sugar beets will vary from 80 to 133
hours or more an acre
Under average
more horses and
are used the man labor on machine
operations will be reduced approxi-
mately 25 per cent
A direct comparison of plowing
crews in Mlchlgun aud Ohio where
conditions under which the work Is
done are uniform shows that approxl-
niutely one hour an acre less of man
labor Is necessary to operate a plow
drawn by three horses than by two
With the larger outfit as also when a
tractor is used a float or plank can
he attached to tho plow and thus the
breaking of a cloddy surface can be
done with little additional effort or
cost In disking In the Michigan and
Ohio districts It was found that n
four-horse outfit saves one-quarter of
an hour of man labor an hour over
the two-horse equipment
Saving in Sugar Beets
Cultivation of sugar beets furnishes
a striking contrast in crew efficiency
In Michigan and Ohio it was found
that 19 man-hours an acre were re-
quired to cultivate once over with a
one-row Implement 16 man-hours
with a two-row cultivator and only 0
of a man-hour for a four-row cultiva-
tor — a distinct saving in man labor by
using the four-row machine As many
fields require attention before it is
possible for the grower to 'get the
work accomplished any saving of la-
bor and time Is an advantage to the
growing crops and affords more man
labor for crops competing with the
sugar beet in the distribution of labor
Under average conditions a crew of
one man and two horses working con-
(Prepared by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
Approximately 100000000 acres of
corn In the United Stutes are annually
given two or more cultivations Culti-
vation Is considered essential In the
corn production The general purpose
of cultivation Is to promote the early
growth and later development of the
corn plant The usual type of culti-
vation is sometimes modified to meet
special conditions such as retarding
the vegetative growth of the plant by
cutting the corn roots In early cultiva-
tion The kind of cultivation will also
vary to some extent to meet the re-
quirements of different methods of
conditions where I Planting
larger Implemehts Some of the most successful corn
growers begin their cultivation before
they plant their crop They claim
that a deep cultivation of the soil at
this time is of as much value as Inter
A visit to ths labors to
1 successful remedy is mi
even the casual looker-on with
an where this
isde impresses
thi
be reli
ability accuracy skill and cleanliness
which attends the making of this great
medicine for woman’s ills
Over 850000 pounds of various herbs
are used anually and all have to be
gathered at the season of tho year when
their natural juices and medicinal sub-
stances are at their best
The most successful solvents aroused
to extract ths medicinal properties from
these herbs
Every utensil and tank that comes in
contact with the medicine is sterilized
and as a final precaution in cleanliness
the medicine is pasteurized and sealed
in Sterile bottles
It is tho wonderful combination of
roots and herbs together with the
skill and care used in its preparation
which has made this famous medicine
so successful in tho treatment of
female ills
The letters from women who hava
been restored to health by the use of
Lydia E Pinkham’s Vegetable Com-
FARMERS ARE W0RKIR8 HARDER
And using their feet more than ever before
For all theae workers the frequent use el
Allen’s Foot Ease the antlieptie healing
a
powder to be shaken into the shoes am
sprinkled in the foot-bath Increaaea their
efficiency and insures needed physical com-
fort It takea the Friction from ths Shoe
freshens ths feet and prevents tired ach-
ing snd blistered feet Women everywhere
are constant users of Allen’s Foot-Ease
Don’t get foot sore get Allen’s Foot-Eees
Sold by dealers everywhere— Adv
The Ruling Passion
Mrs Talkerton — Oh dear I I wish
there was some way to break little
Gladys of sucking her thumb
Her Husband — Don’t worry when
she gets a little older she’ll notice that
It Interferes with her talking Then
she'll quit It herself
r-
Growlng Old
When 'a man gets so he can philoso-
phize It means he Is getting along In
years — Macon Republican
Some are already using bard words
over the tax on soft drinks
cultivations It causes the soil to
warm more ’ quickly destroys early I pound which ws are continually pub-
weed growth and Incorporates the veg- fishing attest to its virtue -etable
matter more thoroughly Into the
soil
Corn Is cultivated to prevent weeds
from robbing the corn of soil moisture
and fertility to put the surface In the
best condition to absorb rainfall to
warm the soli by drying Its surface
quickly and to save moisture by check-
ing the capillary rise to the soil sur-
face '
Corn should be cultivated often
enough to kedp down the weeds and to
maintain a loose soil mulch until the
crop has attained It? growth To sat-
isfy this end a greater number of cul-
tivations will be necessary when rains
at Intervals of a week or so cause
the surface soli to run together and
crust This crust must be broken and
Buy a Farm Now
Beeaua land la cheaper than It will ever
bo again The U 8 Railroad Administration
Is prepared to furnish free Information to
homeseoliere regarding farming opportune
ties Ws have nothing to sail no money to
lend only Information to give Write ms
fully with reference to your needs Nam
the state you want to learn about J U
Edwards Manager Agricultural Section
U 8 Railroad Administration Room 70
Washington D C— adv
“The way of the transgressor Is
hard” when he Is trying to transgress
the laws of nature
hviovo uviaiu WJt I I eiTlsv r
tinuously will lift approximately m K-vy
acres of beets a day A crew of one 1 1
man nnd four horses will probably In- - - -
The Cuttcura Toilet Trie
Ilavlng cleared your skin keep it dear
by making Cutlcura your eyery-day
toilet preparations The soap to cleanse
and purify the Ointment to soothe and
heal the Talcum to powder and per-
fume No toilet table la complete
without them 25c everywhere— Adv
Calling names In an argument may
make the chap called sore but da
they answer hla arguments?'
Important to Mothers
Examine carefully every bottle ©I
CASTORIA that famous old remedy
for infants and children and see that it
Bean the
Signature of (
In Use for Over 30 Years
Children Cry for Fletcher’s Castoria
A daughter Is an embarrassing and
ticklish possession— Menander
STRENGTHENS
BLOOD
Yon can’t expect weak
— r — kidney
filter the adds and poisons out of your
system unless they are givena little help
Don t allow them to become diseased
when a little attention now will pro-
vent It Don’t try to cheat nature
As soon as you commence to havs
--- — -- vvuuuuuvq I J
hV'KScnefl feei nervous and tired 3 El?
B These are usually warnings
“2
crease this area to two acres or pos-
sibly 2Va acres a dny under favorable
condltionsL The performance of the
lifting Implement can be Improved still
further with the addition of more
lioise power If by using nn extra
horse on the lifter this work can be
performed In a shorter period more
time will be available for hauling thje
beets to the factory or loading station
Harvesters Mean Further Economy
An appreciable saving In farm labor
will undoubtedly be accomplished
through the development ofmechnnlc-
al harvesters The hand labor on
sugar beets comprising such opera-
tions as blocking thinning hoeing
pulling topping and loading consti-
tutes from 52 to 75 per cent of the to-
tal mnn labor required In growing the
crop The pulling topping and load-
ing when combined make up 24 to 42
per cent of the work Estimates made
by several growers show a variation
of 24 to 30 hours In the labor require-
ment for the hand work In harvesting
It is very apparent says the bulletin
that this amount can be reduced to n
few hours un acre with the introduc-
tion of the mechanical harvester
Cultivation la Essential In the Produc-
tion of Corn
Magic I- Just drop a little Freezone
on that touchy corn Instantly It stops
aching then you lift the corn off with
the fingers Truly I No humbug 1
Try Freezone 1 Your druggist sells a
tiny bottle for a few cents sufficient to
rid your feet of every hard corn soft
corn or corn between the toes and
calluses without one particle of pain
soreness or Irritation Freezone Is the
discovery of a noted Cincinn&ty genius
the soli mulch restored or excessive
run-off and evaporation will soon rob
the crop of much-needed moisture
Promptness In restoring the soil mulch
after each rain Is of great Importance
This work can be rapidly and less ex-
pensively performed by use of double
cultivators widened and by driving
astride each alternate row as by this
practice the mulch Is restored in half
the time necessary to drive astride of
every row
Corn should not be cultivated so
long as ttfe soil mulch Is In good condi-
tion and free of weeds Corn should
not be cultivated when the soil turns
up In clods breaking the corn roots
and permitting the soil to dry out to
a greater depth thau It would If not
cultivated
HAY CROPS FOR LIVE STOCK
General Pershing’s War Map
In Installing General Pershing’s war
map in the old National Museum build-
ing In Washington the commander’s
room at the frdnt’ Just as It looked
when (he map -was In actual use Is
being reproduced as a setting! Here
will be the chairs used by the general
end his aids wblle they studied the
map which changed hourly night and
day as reports came In and were re-
corded The table at which the officers
looked over documents will stand as It
used to at one side and the walls will
be covered with the Identical llneoleum
that was a background for the map
The map was brought over In pieces
now joined together and the conven-
tional design of the llneoleum Is said
to give an odd kitchenlike domesticity
to the room In which General Pershing
watched history writing itself la a
very literal sense on the walk
BUST
that your kidneys are not working
properly -
Do not
o not delay a minute Go after the
aules will give almost immediate relief
from kidney troubles GOLD -MEDAL
Haarlem Oil Capsules will do
the work They are the pure original
Haarlem Oil Capsules Imported direct
from the laboratories in Haarlem Hol-
your druggist for GOLD
MispAI and accept no substitutes
Look for the name GOLD MEDAL on
every box Three sizes sealed packages
Money refunded if they do not auickly
help you— Adv
SOY BEAN IMPORTANT CROP
Hss High Protein Value and May Bs
Fed to Advantage With Less
Nitrogenous Crops
Many Farmers Unmindful of Neces-
sity of Providing for Fall and
Winter Feeding
Just as our dully bread compares to
cake so morning or house dresses
compare to more dressy clothes for
afternoon nnd evening We can get
along without cuke but not without
bread and we never tire of it Year
after year house dresses are made of
about the same fabrics nnd vary little
in style But In details of their con-
struction there are little differences
and the effort Is to make them more
and more attractive nnd practical
Strong crisp cotton goods coarse
unbleaced linen ginghams percales
and a few heavier weaves appear in
the house dresses that manufacturers
have brought out for the present sea-
son all materials that we have
learned to rely upon for our work-n-day
clothes Many of the new mod-
els have collars and cuffs In white
like the good-looking gingham dross
shown above where a bit of white
appears also set In at the front of the
belt In the form- of u tab with pointed
ends These are turned back nnd
fastened down with flat pearl buttons
This neat finish Is repeated on the
cuffs and at the front of the collar
where two buttons are placed Strops
pipings and fiat buttons contribute ap-
propriate finishing touches to the
dresses and aprons where the chiel
concern Is neatness The narrow bell
and patch pockets are of glnghnm
A striped percale house dress shown
at the right depends upon flat pipings
of another pnttern In stripes of the
same goods for its neat finish These
pipings are often iu white or In 8
plain colored ohnmhrny They serve
to outline the neck pockets belt nntf
whatever other feature the design
wishes to emphasize In this dresS
there is a simulated vest and pockets
are set on cleverly Elbow sleeve
have a flaring flounce and piping de
fines all important lines a band of II
running down the top of the sleeve
(Prepared by the UnlteJ States Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
The soy bean has an Important place
among soiling crops Having a high
protein value the crop may be fed
to good advantage with less nitrogen-
ous crops such as corn sorghum su-
Field of Soy Beans
Little All-Green Hats
Dainty little hnts in jade green have
been modern specialty of by two- or
three of -the leading shops In New
York ’recently ’ No other color Is intro-
duced V Some' are : made entirely ol
taffeta nnd others have soft bands of
breast -feathers in jade These aru
considered especially becoming to gold'
en or black hair
dan grass and millet -The great va-
riation! In tlie time of maturity of the
different varieties of soy beans or thfe
planting of the same variety at differ-
ent (lutes will make It possible to
have a succession of green forage
throughout the greater part of the
summer and fall When the crop has
become well established It grows well
during drought and often succeeds
when other crops falL
(Prepared by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
The high prlcfe of rough feed em-
phasizes the necessity of all farmers
planting a sufficient acreage of sum-
mer forage crops to enable them to
provide themselves with hny and
other roughages for their live stock
during the coming year With the
abundance of pasture available In the
springtime farmers oftentimes are un-
mindful of the necessity of providing
for thnt period during the fall when
pasture will be dry or during the win-
ter when there will be no feed avail-
able The county agents should he con-
sulted with reference to tlie availabil-
ity of seed Where outside purchase!
have to be made the order should be
placed at once so that the seed may
be on hand to sow when the soil is in
good condition and the season Is not
too far advaned
Among the several summer hay
crops for the Southwest sorghum or
Sudan grass are undoubtedly in most
favor In the southeastern territory
sorghum nnd cowpens planted any
time before the first of July will ma-
ture a great abundance of good qual-
ity rough feed for mules or cattle The
county agents should be consulted
with reference to best crops for local
conditions method of planting and
quantity of seed per acre to be used
In different localities
A Fair Proposition
“Mr Grabcoin I‘ve saved up $3000
snd I want to marry your daughter"'
“Do you realize that $3000 won’t
Inst long nowadays?”
“Oh yes sir But It ought to take
care of us for at least six months and
at the end of that time If I haven’t
convinced you that I’m nn Ideal son-in-law
you needn’t do a thing for us"
As we have to live with ourselves
we should 6ee to it that we always
have good company
Authors' Handwriting
If readers and admirers of the pol-
ished sentences of popular authors
could see the original manuscripts
from which their works- are printed
they would be given' interesting side-
lights on the character and personal-
ity ot the writers The handwriting of
G K Chesterton has been described by
an English editor as “shocking” W
W Jacobs comedy writer of the sea
has all his literary work typed and
makes but few corrections on the fin-
ished manuscript Other English
writers whose copy Is reputed to be
neat and quite acceptable to a printer
are H G Wells Rndyard Kipling'
Arnold Bennett and Sir Arthur Co-
nan Doyle Editors say they never
know what to expect from that Im-
aginative genius H de Vere Stacpoole
Sometimes his work Is neatly typed on
good paper but often it Is scribbled to
sheets tord from a copybook
Heard on the Train
“Is this Mr Riley?”
“Eh — what?” said the deaf old chapw
“Is this Mr Riley?”
“Riley! Oh yes!” -
“I knew your father"
“No bother”
“I say I knew" your father"
“What?” - ’ ' f
“I — knew — your — father”
“Oh did ye? So did I"— Boston
Transcript
There's 3 Treason
wliy so many
people make
Nuts
the redular part of at
least one meal each day
It's because of tKe
del Qhtful flavor and 'won-
derful values of Grape-Nuts
as alrealtb builder
-
:i 5
l

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Seward, L. I. Ellis County Capital (Arnett, Okla.), Vol. 11, No. 3, Ed. 1 Friday, July 18, 1919, newspaper, July 18, 1919; Arnett, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1713429/m1/2/ocr/: accessed April 16, 2021), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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