The Jet Visitor (Jet, Okla.), Vol. 15, No. 26, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 10, 1918 Page: 2 of 6

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THE JET VISITOR
t A
PROTEIN SUPPLY
NEEDEDJBY HOGS
Growers Must Provide Substitute
Feeds Which Furnish Mate-
rial for Development
nSH SCRAP IS EXCELLENT
Alfalfa Hay 8oy Beads Cowpeaa and
Oata Are Recommended — Rye
8own In Fall Makee Good Pas-
turea— Peanuta In Favor
(Prepared by United Statea Department
of Agriculture) -Hog
growers should provide home-
grown feed to supply protein — so es-
aentlnl to the proper development of
hogs — and feed them In place of
shorts middlings tankage and oil
meal which are hard to get and high
In price Substitutes for these con-
centrate feeds are founS In crops that
are known to be rich In protein and
we are advising the use of fish meal
where It Is obtainable Alfalfa hay
soy beans cowpens and oats are sug-
gested as good substitute feeds In
addition to these peanuts cottonseed
meal and velvet beans are available
to hog growers in the Southern states
Fish Scrap Is Favored
Fish scrap which has heretofore
been used as a fertilizer has been
tried In hog-feedlng experiments con-
ducted by the department of agricul-
ture and It has been found that meal
made from this material Is on a par
Hogs In Alfalfa a Good Home-Grown
t Protein Feed
with tankage when fed to hogs A
number of state experiment stations
are now conducting similar experi-
ments In feeding fish meal to hogs
Owing to the transportation situation
however It Is believed that fish meal
cannot be fed economically west of
the Mississippi river
Shortage of protein feeds can be
met with alfalfa hay In all localities
where It can be grown or obtained at
reasonable prices There are two
ways In which this hay can be suc-
cessfully fed — In small racks placed
In protected sheds where the hogs may
have free access to It and by grinding
It and feeding It In self-feeders or
soaked In the form of thick slop The
department’s specialists urge that hog
growers provide an ample supply of
alfalfa tJsually the last cutting of al-
falfa Is saved for hog feeding but for
fear this cutting cannot be harvested
In good condition on account of
weather conditions a sufficient amount
of the second and subsequent cuttings
should be saved to supply enough feed
for hogs
Rye sown In the fall makes good
posture for hogs As soon as It Is
three or four Inches high the hogs can
be turned In and left until snow cov-
ers It up Rye also provides good pas-
ture In early spring In the Southern
states Abruzzl rye Is recommended as
SAVE COWPEAS FROM WEEVIL
Fumigation of Stored 8eed With Car-
bon Dlaulphld Prevents De-
structive Attacks
(Prepared by the United States Depart-
ment of Aartculture)
Large supplies of cowpeaa now In
Storage by growers principally In the
southern states can be saved from de-
structive attacks of the weevil by
fumigating with carbon dlaulphld
Bouthern-grown cowpeas usually be-
come heavily Infested by weevils In
storage and as there Is a surplus sup-
ply on hand at present growers should
watch their stored seed carefully
Weevils are particularly destructive
luring warm weather and If they are
aot destroyed soon render stored seed
anflt for feeding or planting
Fumigation by carbon dlsulphld Is a
safe and effective remedy
It Is done by placing seeds In water-
tight barrels to within a few Inches of
the top Into each barrel pour one-balf
tupful of carbon dlsulphld directly on
fhe peas or Into an absorbent material
Wh as cloth or cotton Then cover
It makes a rapid growth and heavier
foliage than other varieties
Soy Beans Are Excellent
Soy beans are valuable to take the
place of other protein feeds usually
purchased They make a very satis-
factory feed when the beans are fed
threshed or ns hoy or when ground
as meal Soy-bean hay to be most
satisfactory should be cut early
enough to avoid the popping out of
the seeds The leaves ond the seed
both will be readily eaten when
handled In this manner
In the Southern states peanuts are
quite extensively grown and make a
good feed when used as a grazing crop
or fed In the form of meal Velvet
beans are largely raised In this sec-
tion of the country and It Is recom-
mended that they be left In the field
and grazed
Dwarf Essex rope and oats con also
be used successfully In the South as a
forage crop Either can be seeded
from the last of August to the last of
September Cottonseed meal can be
very successfully used In connection
with corn as a hardening feed for a
period not to exceed thirty days
SWEET POTATOES IN
UP-TO-DATE HOUSES
Value of Crop Can Be Increased
by Proper Storage
Very Few of Those Placed In Outdoor
Pits or Banks Ever Reach Market
—From 35 to 50 Per Cent
Are Spoiled
(Prepared by the United State Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
Sweet potatoes stored In up-to-date
storage houses bring a higher price on
the market than those stored In banks
and pits By the adoption of the bet-
ter methods of storing and marketing
sweet potatoes their value could be
greatly Increased without Increasing
the acreage or production This s
especFutty True in the South where
they are either rushed on the market at
digging time when the price la low or
stored in outdoor pits or banka where
a large portion of them decay Very
few of the potatoes stored In pits or
banks ever reach the market for from
25 to 50 per cent spoil while those that
remain sound are not of good quality
Even if the pit or bank method of
storage were satisfactory In 'other re-
spects It Is not economical' Too much
labor and expense are required to
make these banks every year and to
get the potatoes out of them when
wanted for market ’ Sweet potatoes
can be marketed more - economically
and to much better advantage from
storage houses It Is not advisable to
open a bank when the soil is wet or
the weather cold as these conditions
Injure the potatoes and cause them to
decay Outdoor pits and banks can
not be depended on In some years i
very small number spoil In banks
while In other years practically the
whole crop la lost The only safe and
practicable method of storing sweet
potatoes Is In a storage house for then
they can be taken out at any time with-
out subjecting them to unfavorable
conditions
PRODUCE MORE WHITE MEATS
Desirable That There Be Decided
Increase In Output and Con-
sumption of Poultry
(Prepared by the United State Depart-
ment of Agriculture)
In order to leave available for the
forces overseas as large a proportion
as possible of the output of cured and
compact meats It Is desirable that
there be a decided Increase la both
home production and home consump-
tion of white meats such as poultry'
Purebred Hen Best
The fowls and eggs from a pure-
bred flock of hens will bring more
money on account of their uniformity
the barrel with double thickness of
heavy wrapping paper or some such
material tied tightly around the top
In order to prevent the fumes of the
chemical from escaping Let the bar-
rel stand for several days and then
examine -
Fumigation should be done during
warm weather It Is difficult to kill
weevils with carbon dlsulphld at a
temperature lower than 65 degrees F
and the best results follow whan the
temperature Is abovt 75 degrees F
The sooner cowpeas are threshed and
treated after harvesting the better as
the treatment kills the young weevil
grubs within the seeds and prevents
them from continuing to devour tho
crop
Growers who have cowpea seed In
storage should send to the United
Statea department of agriculture
Washington D C for Farmers’ Bulle-
tin 988 which gives information re-
garding bean and pea weevils and
Farmera’ Bulletin 799 which gives In-
formation on the use and natnre of
carbon dlsulphld as a fumigant for
cowpeaa These bulletins will be sup-
plied free aa long as the supply lasts
AHUIITIMEOHAT
Pinafore Sailor Is Made In Felt
and Black Velvet
Rolls Up From Head — Has Low Crown
That Does Not Interfere With
Lines of Brim
There Is a strong tendency in France
to simplify street hats to the point of
bare’ severity and there Is a strong
effort here to trim all hats with a
choice of buckles ribbon flowers
plumes cords or embroidery
The sailor with Its straight brlip
has given place to a pinafore sailor
Pinafore sailor taken from the pic-
turesque headgear of an older age
Is kept In fashion and Is shown hers
In black velvet with a band of gros-
graln ribbon around the crown The
corselet blouse of white which Is
worn over a black satin skirt Is em-
broidered' In flowers of black Jet and
fastened with white crochet buttons
that was launched there early! last
spring It Is now made In felt and
black velvet and Is sponsored by the
good milliners It rolls up from the
head and has a low crushed crown
that does not Interfere In any way with
the lines of the brim This hat Is un-
trlmmed except for a crown-band of
satin ribbon and a flat bow at the
side or rather this Is the style In
which It Is advocated for street wear
and worn by well-dressed women but
certain milliners provide Its crown
with a large wreath of colored roses
or ragged chrysanthemums and the
effect Is quite good It Is then appro-
priate for an afternoon hat
By the way duplication Is a strong
point In the modern selection of
clothes The woman who thinks she
must have every gown In her ward-
robe different from the other would
be aghast at the knowledge that cer-
tain fashionable women are leading
the way to having five gowns made
for nn entire season exactly alike and
five hats to go with them exactly
alike
The dressmakers have become ac-
customed to this Innovation during the
last six months and they are now quite
MOCK SEAMS IN NEW HOSIERY
Demand for Full-Fashioned 6tocklngs
Caused Machine to BO Invented to
8atlsfy Women’s Wishes
Of course every woman knows that a
seam up the back of a silk stocking
bespeaks the distinction of that slock-
ing Seamed stockings or as the
manufacturer calls them "Full-fashioned”
stockings are the aristocrats
of hosiery One wears seamless hose
that are bound to wrinkle at the ankle
sooner or later only when compelled
by dire necessity The shops have
been flooded with seamless stockings of
late because now that Imports from
Germany (where stockings used to
come from) have ceased American
mills have not been able to turn out
superior full-fashioned hose fast
enough to supply the demand
One resourceful woman took a needle
and whipped a seam down the back of
her despised seamless stockings Other
women followed her bright example
Soon the canny manufacturers discov-
ered the clever ruse Now there are
machines that put camt uflaged seams
used to It In the preparation of nn
autumn wardrobe A woman comes in
selects an entire costume with core
and attention to every detail then or-
ders as many as she needs for the sea-
son In different materials weights and
colors One woman even ordered her
four evening gowns made exactly alike
merely changing the color
‘ This Is the essence of economy of
time The fashion was evolved out
of that necessity
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN FOLK
Shoes snd Hats Should Harmonize
Velours Moat Desired Coat Fabric-Gowns
Without T rimming
The nll-whlte toilette possesses un-
deniable distinction
Chiffon evening gowns are absolute-
ly without trimming
Wide' tucks are seenon the skirts
of the Paris dresses
Gabardine frocks are belted with
narrow strips vt suede
Flowered cretonnes make attractive
odd waistcoats and smocks
Shoes and hats should harmonize If
a costume is to be successful
One-piece dresses show plain flat
backs with the fronts trimmed
White lawn and lingerie collars are
very charming on linen frocks
Dresses of navy voile printed
foulard are trimmed with beads
Velours in spite of their scarcity
are the most desired coat fabrics
The latest boudoir caps are made
of organdie and scalloped daintily
Tucks and Tucks
Tucks and then more tucks are fea-
tured on the newest frocks of every
thin material The tucks give body
to even the most flimsy fabric and
successfully break down even the
plainest surface! -
WRAP SO NEW IT IS UNNAMED
This charming wrap is of soft white
plush with a pile about a quarter-inch
deep with just the tip dyed black so It
gives the Impression of a black coat
until the wearer moves then It ahowa
wonderful flickering highlight
down the back of cheaper grades of silk
stockings and the ' new mock seam
hosiery except for a difference of fit
at the ankle looks quite as well as the
more expensive sort
Timely Polntere on 8avlng
Save all of your worn silk gloves
kid gloves and belts and pieces of
net they nre quite worth their room
In the catch-baskeL
Cut away the worn parts and seams
from the gloves and use the pieces
of kid to paste In the heels of your
shoes when the lining Is worn out If
the shoe Is ripped at the back take a
few stitches to draw the sides together
before glueing in the piece of kid i
always use glne for it lasts longer
than any other adhesive
The net Is very useful In darning
stocklngB laces embroideries and
silks It re-enforces the thin places
and It requires less thread to the darn-
ing Draw the net pver the darning
mold then draw on the stocking and
darn In ' the usual manner cutting
away the superfluous net after darning
A CHILD DOESN’T
LAUGH AND PLAY
IF CONSTIPATED
LOOK MOTHERI IS TONGUI
COATED BREATH FEVERISH
-AND STOMACH 80UR7
’CALIFORNIA SYRUP OF FIG8
CANT HARM TENDER 8T0M-
ACH LIVER BOWELS
A laxative today suves a sick child
tomorrow - Children simply will not
take the time from play to empty thelir
bowels which become clogged up with
waste liver gets sluggish stomach
sour -
Look at the tongue mother! IF
coated or your child Is listless cross
feverish breath bad restless doesn’t
eat heartily full of cold or has sore-
throat or any other children’s all
ment give a teaspoonful of “Cali-
fornia Syrup of Figs” then don’t
worry because It Is perfectly harm-
less and In a few hours all this con-
stipation poison sour bile and fer-
menting waste will gently move ont of
the bowels and you have a well play-
ful child again A thorough "Inside-
cleansing” Is oftlmes all that Is neces-
sary It should be the first treatment
given In any sickness
Beware of counterfeit fig syrups
Ask your druggist for a bottle of "Cal-
ifornia Syrup of Figs” which has-
full directions for babies children of
all ages and for grown-ups plainly-
printed on the bottle Look carefully-
and see that It Is made by the "Cali-
fornia Fig Syrup' Company”— Adr '
Speed
"A woman can make money go twice
as far as a man can”
"Yes and four times as fast”
Adruco Liquid
Screw Worm Killer
kills the worm
and heals the wound— Adv
By his own conduct every man In the
world fixes his own value
Be very careful how you let remarks
ill— they may hurt a friend
fall
Enemies
WHITE 8COUR8
BLACKLEG
Your Veterinarian can stamp
them out with Cutter’s Anti-Calf
Scour Serum and Cutter’a Germ
Free Blackleg Filtrate and Aggiessin
or Cutter’ Blackleg Pills
Ask him about them If ho
hasn’t our literature write to us for
information on these products
The Cutter Laboratory
Berkeley Cal or Chicago IU
Th Laboratory That Know How9
Renews Furniture
and Floors -
Ont ont this adv and preeenttoOOL-O-VAB dealer-
zot rgli IDUli um can or Mad Slrwt to u
SowaU Paint A Glass Co Manufacturer
KANSAS CITY
Clear Your Skin
WithCuticura
All druggists Soap IS
Ointment 25 A 60 Tal-
cum 25 Sample each
free of "Ceticara
Dept B Boatea"
WHO IS wrpm®n well a mem
are made miserable by
TO kidney and bladder trou-
pe I ble- Thousands recom-
BLAME ?n'1 Sr- KHmer'n
- Swamp-Root the great
kidney medicine At druggists In large
tnd medium size bottle You may re-
®a"’P1 site by Parcel Port also
amphlet telling about It Address Dr
Cllmer A Co Binghamton N Y andt
-(close o cent also mention thla pane it
r
1

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Finch, Ursel. The Jet Visitor (Jet, Okla.), Vol. 15, No. 26, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 10, 1918, newspaper, October 10, 1918; Jet, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1713227/m1/2/ocr/: accessed April 18, 2021), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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