[Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8006]

Description

Photograph used for a story in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "Exitment had reached a fever pitch as everyone waited. A photographer, one of a group of newsmen on 24-hour-a-day watch at the scene , suggested to his boss that it was time to give up: "Nothing is going to happen out there." For five days. Oil drillers had "fished" more than a mile bellow ground for drilling tools lost in the hole. Their progress was slowed by gas bubbles rising in the test. The well had already established itself as a gas producer, anyhow. Many were willing to settle ... continued below

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1 photograph

Creation Information

Matheson, Mandell November 29, 1958.

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This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection and was provided by Oklahoma Historical Society to The Gateway to Oklahoma History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

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Oklahoma Historical Society

In 1893, members of the Oklahoma Territory Press Association formed the Oklahoma Historical Society to keep a detailed record of Oklahoma history and preserve it for future generations. The Oklahoma History Center opened in 2005, and operates in Oklahoma City.

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Titles

  • Main Title: [Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8006]
  • Added Title: First Of City Wells Nears 30Th Birthday

Description

Photograph used for a story in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper. Caption: "Exitment had reached a fever pitch as everyone waited. A photographer, one of a group of newsmen on 24-hour-a-day watch at the scene , suggested to his boss that it was time to give up: "Nothing is going to happen out there." For five days. Oil drillers had "fished" more than a mile bellow ground for drilling tools lost in the hole. Their progress was slowed by gas bubbles rising in the test. The well had already established itself as a gas producer, anyhow. Many were willing to settle for that. The grumbling photographer met the reporter who was to relieve him on watch. He got into his car, started to drive away. An off-duty driller stopped him, began to spin tales of big fields and rich production. At the drilling site, the crew showed a flurry of excitement. On man rushed to the boilers and began working. She's gonna blow in!" the driller said to the photographer and reporter. Alvin Rucker, the photographer, began to set up his camera. Another crew member ran toward the rear parking area. "You'll better move those cars if you want to save them" he cried.Morris Moore, the reporter, took him at his word. Leaving Rucker at the scene, Moore "raced" at 30 miles an hour to a farmhouse nearby where he new there was a telephone. He called his editor. As the editor's phone rang, a plume of white water rose half-way up the derrick. Hearts Sank. Then the plume changed color, to the greenish gold of crude oil, and bedlam broke loose. "We've got one!" shouted Moore into the telephone. That time was 3 p.m. - thirty years ago: Oklahoma City's oil field was born. The roaring infant grew lustily. Almost as fast as word spread - and by 3:15 p.m. news room telephones here were jammed by eager calls from all over the nation inquiring about the gusher.........At its heyday, the field was one of the world's largest. At discovery, it was the richest pool of high-gravity crude in the United States. One man failed, for a time, to share in the glory and fortune was L. E. "Peavine" Trout, a geolgist. He had drilled a "duster" and gone broke on it less than a mile from Idian Territory Illuminating Oil Co. No. 1 Oklahoma City discovery well. And Trout's site was drilled deeper in the first year of the field's history to produce another gusher............A pair of University of Oklahoma geology students, John R. Bunn and John E. VanDall, had studied the area also. They traced out a structure which began on a farm north of Oklahoma City and stretched down nearly to the Cleveland county line. When they turned the report of their work - a term project for a geology class - in to Dr. G. E. Anderson, the professor laughingly told them there wasn't and oil-bearing structure that big. A short time later, Foster had Dr. Anderson check his geologist reports showing virtually the same thing. And on June 12, the first test was "spudded in." The drillers made hole rapidly, at the site in C SE SE of 24-11n-3w..............The original well, in fact, is till on line. It's a gasser now, its oil supply having been exhausted some yime ago. The derrick has been removed, and all that shows is a pipe coming from the ground into a large tank. That, the four concrete forms on which the derrick rested. And on one of the forms, a sign, required by state law to identify the well - but it identifies maore than that, with its simple legend: "Oklahoma City No. 1."

Physical Description

1 photograph

Notes

PublishDate: O-11-30-58

Credit: Daily Oklahoman

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Source

  • "First Of City Wells Nears 30Th Birthday", Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, November 30, 1958

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Collections

This photograph is part of the following collection of related materials.

Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection

The Oklahoma Publishing Company, the parent company of many prominent Oklahoma newspapers, amassed a significant collection of photographs that span more than a century. The wide variety of photographs accompanied stories in the newspapers.

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  • November 29, 1958

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Added to The Gateway to Oklahoma History

  • June 15, 2020, 7:12 a.m.

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Matheson, Mandell. [Photograph 2012.201.OVZ001.8006], photograph, November 29, 1958; (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc1693746/: accessed July 5, 2020), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.