The Lawton Constitution (Lawton, Okla.), Vol. 13, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 14, 1915 Page: 1 of 8

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Publicity ii
Greatest
Moral Force
In World
THE LAWTON CONSTITUTION
Live News Ob
Every Pag*
In Every
Column
VOI«UME XIII—NO. 24.
LAWTON, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1915.
WEEKLY EDITION
WASTING
HUNDREDS
\RE GERMANS AND AUSTRIANS
IN ATTEMPT TO CUT WAY
THROUGH.
RUSSIANS ARE READY
With Reinfor«b£ nis to Meet Any At-
tack Before the Spring Rain
Flood Front.
T'.y the United Press.
PETROGRAD, Jan. 13.—Anticipat-
ing another attempt by the Germans
to break through the Russian lines be-
fore spring rains flood the front,
trong Russian reinforcements were
-ent to Nieman and Bzura rivers.
The general situation in Poland 1
Calida is satisfactory to the Russians.
The Germans and Austrians hold to
every point and are wasting hundreds
in their fruitless effort cut their way
through.
: "^,1 :2 BANK ROBBERIES IN OKLAHOMA :7Apm K
- ♦ AND A DEPUTY SHERIFF KILLED: j:i,™ : p J r*
aAID FLED
♦ By the United Press. ♦
♦ ROME, Jan. 13. — Believing ♦
♦ that Italy will join the allies, ♦
♦ Germans in Italy are closing up ♦
♦ their business and returning to ♦
♦ Germany. The Garibaldi demon- ♦
♦ strations greatly displeased the ♦
♦ kaiser. i, . ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦
GERMAN SUBMARINES
ARE REPORTED SUNK
By the United Press.
LONDON, Jan. 13.—This eveninx's
News fcaid that there we're sub-
; marines accompanied by aeroplanes
mar English coast. The .loul^egts
{spied the submarines and shore bat-
'teries sank them.
iThe admirals js ofticially silent.
Also reported that two German
| submarines that tried to raid into
i Dover were sunk by land batteries.
By the United Press.
OKLAHOMA CITY, JAN. 13.—THE F1FTENTH BANK ROBQERY
IN OKLAHOMA SINCE LAST 2, OCCURRED AT 4:30 THIS MORN-
ING, WHEN BANDITS WHO CAME AND WENT IN AN AUTOMO.
BILE AND WORKED WITH SILENCE AND PRECISION LOOTED THE
GARBER STATE BANK, AT GARBER, OKLA., 13 MILES EAST OF
ENID OF $2730..
The robbers pried open the front door and dug hole through the brick
vault and blew the safe.
It was also the second robbery in twenty-four hours, as three bandits
of whom, two were captured and one badly wounded, having taken $3,000
from the First National Bank of Terlton, late yesterday.
In a running fiyht the Terlton bandits killed Deputy Sheriff Bob Moore.
By the United Precs.
PETROGRAI), Jan. 13.—The Turk-
ish advance guard occupied Tabriz,
the next largest city in Persia.
GREAT DAMAGE
BY SEA GALE
By the United Press
NEW YORK, JAN. 13. — TWO
PERSONS WERE KILLED HERE
AND A FREIGHTER IS AGROUND
AT STATUE OF LIBERTY.
There was also considerable prop-
erty damaged by the gr last night
and is continuing today.
U. S. revenue cutter has gone o aid
a schooner reported to be ashore at
Barnegat.
INSTALLATION EXERCISES.
18 PERSONS ABANDONED
ARE KILLED CREW LOST?
The Royal Neighbors and Modern
Woodmen will hold their installation
exercises, Thursd ly night, January
14th, at the hall of the orders. Re-
freshments will be served and a most
pleasant time is anticipated.
DISMEMBERED
BODY OF BABY
By the United Press.
CLINTON, ILLS., JAN. 13.—
THRERE IS A COMPLETE , MYS:
TERY AS TO THE ONE YEAR OLD
MALE CHILI) DECAF'ITATEI)
AND DISMEMBERED, FOUND TO-
DAY IN A BOXCAR IN 'ILLINOIS
CENTRAL YARDS.
By the United Press.
'ROME;-JAN. 13.—AN EARTH-
QUAKE SHOOK THE CITY THIS
MORNING.
THE POLICE AND FIREMEN
WERE ORDERED OUT.
THERE WAS A PANIC, BUT
NONE REPORTED HURT, SO FAR.
THERE WERE SEVERAL BUILD-
INGS DAMAGED.
NEW LAW FIRM)
OLD PRACTITIONERS.
JACK LOVE IS
CHAIRMAN AGAIN
HE IS CHOSEN FOR FIFTH TIME
BY OTHER CORPORATION
COMMISSIONERS.
OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. 13.—For
the fifth time since statehood, and in-
cidentally since the organization of
the corporation commission, Jack
Love has been elected chairman n*
that body. This action was taken at
the reorganization of the commission
Tuesday. J. H. Hyde was renamed as
secretary, the other employes of
the commission remaining in the same
positions that they have occupied dur-
ing the past two years.
Jack Love was elected as a corpor-
ation commissioner in 1907, at the
first election that Oklahoma as a
state, held, and he has been on that
body, and chairman of it continuously
since that time. This record is one
which is approached by no one in a
like position in the United States, the
nearest approach being that of the
chairman of the Iowa board, who
has been chairman of his body for
three successive terms.
Previous to statehood, Mr. Love had
been successively a boy on the farm,
a section hand, a school teacher, a cow
boy on the vast plains of Texas and
lastly a farmer in the territory of Ok-
lahoma. During the time that he was
working for the railroad, he secured
.such schooling as was possible, and
after five years of this work qualified
as a school teacher. After having won
a scholarship at the Sam Houston
State normal at Huntsville, Texas, he
conducted a high school of his own for
four years, after which he came to
Oklahoma.
Previous to the opening of the
Cherokee strip, Love was in business
at Oklahoma City for four years, but
in 1893 was appointed sheriff of
Woodward county, in which office he
maintained peace and order in a 'wild
and wooly" community until caught
by a populist landslide.
Deciding to become a candidate for
corporation commission, he rented a
small office in Woodward, employed a
stenographer and, with the use of
postage stamps conducted a winning
campaign.
Judge J. T. Johnson, who has re-
cently retired as district judge, has
formed a partnership with Judge W.
C. Stevens, in the practice of law. Thfs
makes a new firm of old practitioners
—not old in the sense of age, but in
experience and learning in the law. It
is a good and strong combination. The
Constitution predicts for the partner-
ship great success.
i Bv the United Press.
' GALVESTON, JAN. 13.—THE
i
YACHT WAKIVA, ONE OF THE
j FIN EST AFLOAT, AND THE
PROPERTY OF EDWARD DOHENY
j WAS FOUND ABANDONED OFF
TAMPICO BAR TODAY.
] There are fears entertained for the
safety of the crew.
Details are lacking of gale at sea.
SURPRISING VOTE ON
WOMAN SUFFRAGE
By the United Press.
PERETO, Italy, Jan. 13.—Eighteen
persons were killed here by the earth-
quake shock that was also felt at
Rome.
Many other cities "offered some
damage and interrupt!' .i from the
severity of the earthquake.
Several churches were badly dam-
aged. St. Peter's is slightly cracked.
The railroad station and Royal
Tobacco factory were badly damaged.
The Province of Abruzzi is believed
to be enormously damaged and a
heavy life loss there.
It is the severest earthquake ever in
Italy proper.
S. L McELHOES RETURNS
TO LAWTON TO STAY.
S. 1. MeElhoes, who has Deen serv-
ing us an assistant in the attorney
general's office for some time, has re-
turned to Lawton and resumed his
conation with the firm of MeElhoes,
Ferns & Rhinefort. Mr. MeElhoes in-
forms us that he will push the investi-
gation to be made by the corporation
commission as to the charges for elec-
tricity made by the Comanche Light &
Power company. He has had three or
four similar cases in different parts of
the state, so knows the plan of pro-
oeedure ii, such cases. He has been
able to secure reductions and satis-
factory adjustments elsewhere.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 13.—
The house of representatives last
night by a vote of 204 to 174 refused
to submit to the states an amendment
to the federal constitution to enfran-
chise women.
The vote, the second in the history
of congress on the woman suffrage is-
sue, came at the close of a day of long
prepared-for oratory during which
the many speakers were listened to
with frequent evidence of approval
or disapproval by packed galleries.
The question was before the house on
the Mondell resolution to submit a
constitutional amendment providing
that the right of suffrage should not
be abridged " because of sex."
A two-thirds affirmative vote was
necessary to adopt the resolution. It
was defeated by a majority of thirty.
Party lines were not strictly drawn
in the fight, though Democratic Lead-
er Underwood, voicing the attitude of
his party that suffrage is a state is-
sue, strongly opposed the resolution
while Republican Leader Mann was
'me of the chief speakers for suf-
fragists.
GATHERING DATA
OF SHIPMENTS
BELIEVED THIS COUNTRY CAN
SHOW HAS NOT VIOLATED
SHIPPING REGULATIONS.
By The United Press.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 12.—
Interstate Commerce Commission and
Treasury Department are aiding the
State Department to gather statistics
of our trade with neutrals in war
area.
It is intended to refute the British
contention that extra exports of con-
traband to neutrals is prima facie evi-
dence that the neutrals re-export to
I England's enemies .
The neutrals probably will also
deny this charge; otherwise, Eng-
land's preliminary reply to our ship-
ping protest is extremely satisfac-
tory is the official comment.
It will be withheld until a complete
reply is received.
The United States expects volun-
tary concessions from England while
the controversy is pending.
ITALY STARTING
INTO CONFLICT
THIS INITIAL STEP WILL NO
DOUBT BE FOLLOWED BY
DEFINITE ACTION.
By the United Press.
VENICE, Jan. 12.—Refugees from
Trieste reported the people of that
city in a panic fearing a bombard-
ment by part of the allied fleet, which
is again active in the Adriatic sea.
| The Albanian insurgents are plac-
| ing guns in position commanding
• Durazzo.
Italian warships are in the harbor
and have landed marines to protect
I Italian interests. They will resist any
! insurgent assault.
How Oklahomans Voted.
For Resolution.
Bird S. McGuire, First district.
Dick T. Morgan, Third district.
James Davenport, Third district.
Scott Ferris, Fifth district.
Joe B. Thompson, at large.
Against Resolution.
CI. lrles D. Carter, Fourth district.
Claude Weaver, at large.
William Munay, at large.
LITTLE NAVY ADVOCATES
DEFEATED IN COMMITTEE.
By the United Press.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 13.—
The house naval committee recom-
mended two new battleships next
year. This is a defeat for little navy
advocates
MOTHER TEACHERS WIN.
| ALBANY, N. Y., Jan. 12—A teach-
er may not be dismissed because she
absents herself from the public
| schools to bear a child, Commission-
er John H. Finley of the state depart-
i ment of education decided Monday.
I The decision definitely determines the
status of mother teachers in the
| state, as under existing laws there is
; no appeal.
FOUNDRY INCORPORATED.
Articles of incorporation have been
filed with the secretary of state for
the Stephens' Machine and Foundry
company, of Lawton, in the sum of
$10,000. The incorporation are: J. R.
Yartorough, Fred Cowell and B. R.
Stephens.
MARRIAGE LICENSE.
I Geoiga White, 23, of Gotebo, and
! Miss Susie Kauley, 19, of Meers.
PLAN OF PRECAUTION
AGAINST ZEPPLIN RAID
By the United Press.
PARIS, Jan. 11.—A German Zep-
plin raid is expected and General
Gallena and War Minister Millerand
conferred to make a plan or precau-
tion.
By the United Press. ♦
♦ WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. ♦
♦ 13.—The Carranzista agency ♦
♦ here asserted that their forces ♦
♦ were within thirty miles of Me*- ♦
♦ ico City and that capital is in a ♦
♦ panic in fear of assault or siege. ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
FROM MEXICO CITY AFTER THE
CARRANZISTAS WON VICTORY
NEAR THERE.
THREATENS TO EVICT 1 WHERE ARE VILLlSTAS7
MINERS UNLESS WORK flntjfiLLiaiAS.
Bv the United Press.
WHEELING, W. Va., Jan. 13.—
The strike in eastern Ohio of 16,000
miners reached a climax today when
the coal operators announced a gen-
eral reopening for tomorrow.
Every striker who faiis to respond
will be evicted. The strike has lasted
ten months.
Carranzistas are Reported to Have
Been Defeated at Monterey and
Retreated to Matamoras.
DIED THIS MORNING.
Stephen Everton, aged 33, died of
tuberculosis, Wednesday morning 8
o'clock, at 907 Summit. The funeral
will take place Thursday afternoon 2
o'clock from St. Clair undertaking
parlors.
By the United Press.
GALVESTON, Jan. 13.—Mexico
City has been evacuated by Zapata is
stated officially from Vera Cruz in a
cablegram to Carranzista Consul
Burns here.
General Obregon won a signal vic-
tory yesterday at San Martin, near
the capital.
This dispatch did not detail whether
General Obregon had entered the cap-
ital or what became of the Villistas
supposedly there.
BASKET BALL GAME.
There will be a basket ball game
this evening at the high school gym-
nasium between the Lawton Inde-
pendents and the high school team. It
will be well worth seeing as both
teams have been practicing for some
time and are in the best of condition.
Reverend and Mrs. J. W. Sims,
Reverend and Mrs. W. H. Roper and
Mrs. C. L. Pedigo are at Altus to be
in attendance at a missionury meet-
ing of the South Methodist churches.
They are delegates from the local
church.
By the United Press.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 13.—
Carranzistas were ba defeated at
Monterey and are flt^ ng to Jrfata-
moras.
Also the Neuvo Laredo Carranzista
garrison is going to Matamoras for
its last stand.
USEFUL INVENTION
Perry Cox, the operato. of the pic-
ture machine at the Met theatre has
invented a contrivance by which he
can gho a continuance performance—
one reel succeeding another without
any perceptible stop. He has applied
for a patent to his invention. It is
quite a convenience in the operation
of picture ma -jones.
COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT CROSBY
TO INSIST ON SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
To the Teachers and Clerks of School
District Boards:—
I wish to call your attention to the
provisions of our new Compulsory
School Law. Under this new law the
pupils from eiuht to sixteen years of
age are to be in school 60 per cent of
the number of days that school is
maintained in the district. If the
term is six months, pupils must be in
attendance four months of the time;
if seven months, four and two-thirds
months atendance, etc.
The cotton situation this year has
made it necessary for some pupils to
be absent from school who are usual-
ly enrolled at the beginning of the
term. In the great majority of cases
the time has now elapsed and the
pupils who have been absent must at
once be entered in (school, that they
may comply with the compulsory law.
It is the duty of the teacher to as-
sist the school board in ascertaining
what pupils are absent; these should
be notified at once. The parents or
guardians shall be informed as to the
provisions of the Compulsory At-
tendance Law and the severe penalty
for non-attendance.
Report to me by January 18th if
there are any pupils in your district
between eight and sixteen years of
age who have not at yet enrolled in
school. If there are any children in
your district who are being kept out
of school on account of insufficient
clothing, the Associated Charities of
Lawton will gladly assist so these
children may enter school at once.
The Associated Charities are anxious
to help any deserving citizen of this
county who need clothing, shoes, etc.
Books for those who are absolutely
unable to buy may be had through the
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
DENY EVACUATION REPORT ♦

By the United Press. ♦
LAfeEDO, Jan. 12.—In deny- ♦
ing the evacuation of Monterey, ♦
the Carranzistas state that Gen- ♦
eral Maclovio Perrera with 7,- ♦
000 fresh constitutionalists ♦
troops arrived at Monterey this ♦
morning and will give Villistas ♦
battle, also will re-attack Sal- ♦
tillo. ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
J. ROV WILLIAMS
SUED BY S. P. RENDER
J. Roy Williams is in Lawton today.
He was served in Oklahoma City
with papers in a suit broupht by S. P.
Render, asking for damages in the
sum of $50,000.
Mr. Williams says that the suit is
based on an advertisement inserted
for the McAlester street electric rail-
way company at tlie time S. P. Ren-
der and the managers of the Coman-
che Light and Power company were
seeking a franchise in McAlester, sup-
recommendation of the School Board
of the district.
Following are the sections of
school law relating to compulsory at-
tendance:
Art. 13. Sec. 186. Compulsory Per-
iod. Duties of Parents: It shall be un-
lawful for any parents or guardian
living in the State of Oklahoma, to
neglect to cause or compel any person
or persons who are or may be under
their control or wards to attend and
comply with the rules of some public,
privata or other school or schools un-
less other means of education are pro-
vided, for at least sixty-six per cent
of the number of days the school or
schols of the district are maintained,
which shall apply to all children of
•the district over the age of eight and
under the age of sixteen, unless they
are prevented by mental or physical
disability, the question of disability
to be determined by the School Dis-
trict Board or Board of Education un-
on a certificate from a duly licensed
and practicing physician.
Sec. 190. Penalty for Violation. Any
person violating the provisions of any
section of this article shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor and, upon convic-
tion shall be fined in any sum not less
than Ten Dollars nor more than
Twenty-five Dollars. Each day a child
is out of school contrary to the pro-
vision of this article shall constitute
a separate offense. Said fine, when
collected shall be credited to the
School Fund of the District in which
the offending party resides.
Please see that all parents or
guardians are notified so they may
comply at once with the provisions of
the Compulsory Attendance Law.
JENNETT S. CROSBY,
County Superintendent.
posed to be in retaliation for the Law-
ton street railway company securing
a franchise in this city.
Mr. Williams says that there is
nothing worth while to the suit.
COTTON GINNED IN
COMANCHE COUNTY.
The census gathered of the cotton
ginned in Comanche county during the
year prior to January 1, 1915, were
22,664, as compared to 14,313 bales
for the year 1913 to January 1, 1914.
Subscribe for the Constitution,
Lawton's leading newspaper.
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The Lawton Constitution (Lawton, Okla.), Vol. 13, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 14, 1915, newspaper, January 14, 1915; Lawton, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc128661/m1/1/ocr/: accessed May 18, 2022), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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