The Oklahoma State Capital. (Guthrie, Okla.), Vol. 21, No. 226, Ed. 1 Sunday, January 16, 1910 Page: 1 of 12

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GIVE IT YOUR ENCOURAGEMENT—Da V011 want to see a vigorous fearless ncwso;
rights of every citizen and for the protection of the pockets .of the tax payers and at the same time giu
It tells the truth no matter who it hits. Get on the list at the very special mail rate now on, the lowest
$2.75; two years $5.00' three years 06.75; five years $10.00. Many-are getting the paper [<^>$2.00 a
day. If you are now on the list, tell your neighbor. •
UVC!
year
A nwna>or0
1
-on; that will fight for the
icourage The State Capital
er in "Oklahoma; one year
ears. Mail votir check" to-
OWE XXL
SUNDAY MORNING
C-U'l'HKlti, OKLAxiOIUa, JANUARY 16, 1910.—TWELVE PAGES.
SUNDAY MORNING
NUMBER 225.
4
t ft •
; I
FEW M9R
E COLD FACTS
ABOUT CI1Y AFFAIRS
:
REID DENIES IT
WHAT GUTHRIE
HAS EXPENDED
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS
MADE NECESSARY BE-
CAUSE OF GROWTH.
rRUTH, NOT MERE GUESS
Misstatements and Misleading
Representations Which Cause
People to Doubt All Statements
of Son-in-Law's Sheet—Truth
Is What People Want.
NEW YORK, Jan. 15.—Whltelaw
Held, the American Ambassador
Great Britain, denies positively that
he sanctioned a letter for use in the
British election. The missive wa9
wrongfully used by a unionist candi-
date in his campaign.
Ambassador Reid reached here yes
terday to attend the funeral of 1")
Ogden Mills, but was prevented from
landing until today on account of
severe storm.
TO ELECT HARRIS
REPUBLICANS MEET HERE
Wagoner Man Has no Opposition
for State Chairmanship to Sue
ceed Joe Norris—Assurance of
Support From All Over State—
Party Prospects Good.
The real persons concerned in Guth-
rie, in the matter of a change from
the present form of government to
that of a commission form of govern-
ment, are the taxpayers.
They do not care one iota about the
endeavors on the part of a publica-
tion which has never been loyal to
them and it's attempt to discredit tin
State Capital, which has always been
loyal to Guthrie, what the taxpayers
want is absolute information as to
whether they will be benefitted or
merely held up for additional cost for
city government.
The State Capital deals In facts and
refers all those who may have the!man, nt
slightest doubt, to the records of the1 ditlons.
PUSH TO
T
LIBERALS ME
ENGLISH ELECTIONS CHIEF-
LY MARKED BY MIXED
VICTORY.
SIX ELECTED BY LABORITES
WALLACE IN BRONZE
in
lUiilj ill
** u i 1 f :
MtN
i t Li II
SPEAKERSHIP IS
DIEKEMA'S GOAL
UNDER NEW CHARTER
> . •
••••A!
ram* !
D
BOSTON. Jan. 15.—John F. Fitz-
gerald Is elected mayor of Boston by
a plurality placed unofficially at 1,223
Ills nearest competitor was James J
MICHIGANDER ANNOUNCES st"r,r,ow- „ „ , , „ . „ .
This was the first election in Bos-
CANDIDACY FOR HOUSE
PLACE.
IS ONE OF THE REGULARS.
Result of Contest Given as Union-
ists 43, Liberals 37, Laborites 6,
Nationalists 5—Liberals Get 7
Out of the Twelve Londoi
Seats.
The republican state central committee,
upon the call of Acting Chairman Jaines
A. Harris, meets here tomorrow after
noon at 2 o'clock, at the lone hotel, t
elect a state chairman and also to in
augurate the state campaign. Mr. liar
ria is the only candidate for chairman, j
all indications pointing to his election j
unanimously. He is to succeed Joe H.
Norris, of Guthrie, who resigns in order
t«> devote aU his ?itn< to his duties / j
chief Indian inspector under the inte' or
department at Washington.
Mr. Harris has had assurances dur-
ing the past few days from all portions
of the Htate, and there is no dissenting
voice in regard to Ids election as chair-
egard to republican con-
where It is the same—
LONDON, Jan. 15.—At the close of the
general elections today the standing of
the various parties, Including uncon-
tested seats, was as follows:
Unionists. 43; liberals, 37; laborites. 6;
nationalists. 5.
Unionists gains, 18; liberal gains, 3;
laborites gains over liberals, 1; no change
59.
Of the twelve ••'ts contested In Lon-
don. the liberals holt! seven, the unionists
five; three of the latter being in North
Lambeth. Brixton and Fulham.
a* Cm. L£W
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15.—Before a
distinguished assemblage a statute of
General Lew Wallace, the author, of
' Ben Hur," was unveiled in the Hall
of Fame at the capitol. L evy Wallace
Jr., the grandson of the illustrious au-
thor, soldier pjmI sMtemian pull* d Mc-
cord, unveiling the figure. William
Allen Wood made the presentation
speech on behalf of the commission.
Governor Thomas Marshall, of Indi-
ana, accepted it for the State. Addres-
es were made by Senator Beveridge
and A. Rustem Bey, the Turkish
charge do* affairs, James Whltcomb
Riley read a poem written by him for
the occasion.
ton under the new charter, which per-
mits no political designation on the
ballot, does away with the board of
aldermen and city council, and In their
place substitutes a city council of nin
members. This charter, known as
"Plan Two" when It was voted upon,
was opposed by Mr Fitzgerald and
was put through by Mr. Storrow and
Aspirant for Mantle of Sage of his friends
Danville Regarded as Brilliant VnAcr this charter Mr. Fitzgerald
Parliamentarian—Champ Clark
Makes Facetious Comment
Other Candidates.
city or state where there will be found conditions excellent for republican sus-
ubsolute proof of all statements made.''ess. Many repuhli-ana are no warriving
The State Capital has but one wish ln rit>' to attf,nd th'1 meeting tn-
—that of Informing the people and morrow nn(' n11 ,iavo wor'ls of congra-
leaving to the taxpayers the decision ,lulat,on for lhe ftct,n* chairman.
as to what is best for them; and be-! Among the republicans of promln
A. Bartholo-
mew. of Altus; Jake Hamon, of Lawton;
Paul Cooper, of Shawnee; .TudgP W. TI.
H. Clayton, of McAlester; Mort Stil-
well, of Bartlesville. Mr. Hamon In
very enthusiastic ove. conditions and
says Harris will he elected chairman
without opposition.
"In the first? place he ought to be
.v.- ted," and Hamon. "He is fitted In
ary 1, The State Capital company 1 vcrv mnnn„ for ,he position, In thor-
received for Etreet paviiiR advertise-1 pm.te,i on conditions in all r«'"
ments and all other work done for thej of tv,0 state, and he is an organizer
city exactly $677. The afternoon pa-! from the Round up: and In the next
per makes the statement that The place there's nohodv that can beat him."
Htate Capital received $3,000. The j "I look for much good to result from
cause of that purpose the State Cap- J already in lhe city art' .1
Ital has been dealing with facts.
FEW PERSONAL REMARKS.
However, before we go into figures
which most concern the general public
we desire to make a few personal re-
marks.
The books of the city show that;
during the five months closing Janu-
LONDON, .Jan. 1" The first engage-
ment in the fight for tariff reform, a
great navy r.nd the supremacy of the
j lords as against free trade, reform of
1 the house of lords and home rule ended
ith neither party in a com-
anding position. The results of the
polling today do not tend to confirm the
forecast that the liberals will retain con-
trol of the government. The unionists
have gained an encouraging number of
seats, although less than the 20 which
they expected to take away from the
liberals out of the 74 balloted for.
people against liberals
The popular vote goes strongly against
the liberals. The members of that party
who hold sents won them today by
majorities ranging- from 30 to 00 per cent
befow their majorities in 1906, ex.-opt in
a few boroughs where special conditions
figured in the campaign. The popular
votes polled bv the liberals for the twelve
London seats show a stronger hold on
power than In the provinces. The ma-
jority of the London boroughs were labor
districts. Of these the unionists carried
five, three being captured from the lib-
eral column, but by small majorities
Manchester and Birmlnghan give heavy
unionist gains.
Birmingham has been strongly conser-
vative. larpely the result of Joseph
Chamberlain's crusade for protection, and
today the unionists carried the «!ty
solidly, nearly 8.000 larger than in *90S.
FOR TARIFF REFORM.
The most sweeping change in T.ondon
was in Fulham borough, where the mid-
dle class population went for tariff re-
ISF
CLEARING SWOPE MYSTERY.
Stomach of Millionaire s Nephew
Contained Deadly Drug, De-
clare Attorney Atwood—One of
Executors ol Will 111 at Col-
umbia. •
*
t
*
*
1-
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15.— R.^presen- 4.
tative G. J. Diclcema, of Michigan, to- -f
day announced his candidacy for.-f-
speaker of the house of representa-j •£
tives to succeed "Uncle Joe" Cannon:£
at the end of the present session. j *
Speaker Cannon lias made it clear, ^
he has no intention of resigning be- \
T
; will serve four years.
TTTTTT t i J: i
WEATHER.
WASHINGTON. Jan. IB. -Fore-
cast. Oklahoma ami Arkansas;
unsettled and warmer Sunday
possibly rain by Sunday night or
Monday.
Missouri; partly cloudy and
warmer Sunday; rain or snow on
Sunday night or Monday.
Kansas; unsettled and warmer
Sunday; Monday rain.
ASYLUM WiLL
HAVE NEW HEAD
RESIGNATION ACCEPTED
YESTERDAY TO BE EF-
FECTIVE AT ONCE.
DR. GRIFFIN MAY SUCCEED.
Management of Norman Sani-
tarium Confirms Report of
Change-Every Effort to Be
Made to Comply With State'3
Demands -About Appointments.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 3. column 1 continued on page 3, column S. continued on page 3. column 2
Good Morning, Have You Had Your Pogonip?
PITTSBURG, Pa.. Jan. 15.—'"Good
morning, have you had your pogonip '
the way the resKlents of this city
have been greeting each other since
Henry Pennywitt, the )<'«•■with-
er forecaster, announced that tin air
c f the city was surehan; d with
••pogon'n," and advised his customers
to wT ir facial curtains to keep from
eating more than their share. A
majority of the citizens have follow-
ed his advice, and the streets were
filled with folks wearing their fea-
tures nt half mast.
He explains that "pogonip" is Indian
for "white d'-ath." and is cans- d by fac.s upholstered."
) SAXMAN UND-)
splcula of ice. His announcement has
caused a mild sensation, and Pitts
burgers who have gone along year in
and year out coughing up chunks of
bituminous and .'inthraclte without
getting alarmed have made arrange-
ments to have the lower part of their
fore the end of his present term. His
position is that any man has the right j ^ '• ^ ^ r ^ x ^ "£ -f
to bo a candidate• far the speaker- dunlop is in pace.
J Robert Dunlop, of Newkirk, will at
The speaker has already announced nn,.a ,lnn„unr, his ,.amildaey for Mat«
his candidacy for re-election to con- treasurer subject to nomination in the
gress, but lias never declared he would democratie primaries. it 1m understood
again be a candidate for the speaker- that lie Is brought out by the supporters
ship. Posides Mr. Diekema, a num- of Murray for governor.
ber of names of possible speakership
KANSAS CITY Jan. 1.V—Confirmation
the rumor that poison had been fdLind
in the st mm h of i l.nsman Swiipe. and
that this l.'.l i an autopsy on the body
of his millionaire uncle, Colonel Thomas
I-f. h'wope, was given tonight by At-
torney John H. Atwood. Attorney At-
wood is one of the attorneys for the
.>\vope <: :ate and h' - I ken a prominent
part in the investigation of the mystery.
So firmly convinced are the investiga-
tors that the .poison administered to
Chrlsman Swope by some one with crim-
inal Intent that an arrest may be made
in the ease tomorrow.
"The poison found in Chrisman Swope's
stomach may have been strychnine, at-1
though we are not in :t position to state!
Ibis positively." said Mr. Atwood. "Dr. I
T.evb- llektoen. who made fr'ie report of
the finding of the poison, has not hem
able to pay just what it is."
Attorney Atwood and others prominent
in tl^ inquiry kfew /that ' hrisman
Swope's stomaeh contnlned poison before
the body of Colonel Swope was exhumed
last Wednesday. The facts were kept
a secret until tonight, however.
Chrlsman Swope died on December R.
Pr. R. C. Hvile, wh) is the husband of
a niece of Colonel Swope. signed the
death certificate. The cause of death
was given as typhoid fever.
SWOPE EXECUTOR ILL.
COl.T'MRIA. Tenn., Jan 15.—Stewart
S. Fleming, one of the heirs of the late
Thomas Swope, of Kansas City, and
executor of the Swope will, is critically
111 of typhoid fever at his home here.
Mr Fleming became ill shortly after
arriving home from a recent visit to
St. Louis.
andidates have been mentioned, in-
cluding Walter I. Smith of Iowa, a
member of the rules committee; Mar-
tin P. Olmsted, of Pennsylvania,
chairman of the insular commission;
and James R. Mann, of Illinois, chair-
man of the committee on interstate
and foreign commerce.
NOT AN INSURGENT.
Mr. Diekema does not believe Mr.
Cannon will again be a candidate for
the speakership. "I am regular, not
an insurgent," said Mr. Diekemati.
'So man could ever give me whiter
treatment than Speaker Cannon has
given and I think he is the fairest
presiding officer I ever saw in a chair.
continued on page 2, column 9.
finis list
NORMAN", Okla.. Jnn. 1."..—Dr. A. T.
Clark, who Ims for the past five years
been at the head of the Norman sani-
tarium, will retire from the local man-
agement and In all probability he suc-
reeded by pr. L>. W. Griffin, the pres-
ent sanitarium physician.
It Is stated that Dr. Clark has been ill
111 health for the past eight months
and that some four months ago he ten-
dered Ills resignation, but because of tin
fact that it v.-as found extremely diffi-
cult to fill Ills place, the resignation was
not accepts until yesterday and th«
position mode vacant offered to Pr-
. JJ^JYnuTD^N PAGE 2 COLUMN
nvmnat
s on
ains Continu-
ary 20,1910
.•
rj- -r
Have you some spare time?
Why not make $3.00 to K
$5,.00 a day out of it, and
live right at home?
Write us how to do it. '(•
The Farmer Publishing Co., ^
Guthrie, Okla.
STOEM TAKE.1! HEAVY FALL,
Eighteen Thousand Men in New!
York City Battling With 14 1-21
Inches of Snow Mayor Gaycorj
Has Narrow Escape—Compan-
ion Badly Hurt.
NEW YORK. Jan. 15 -Nine lives were
lost and six persons Injured in one of
the worst storms that ever visited New
York City. The total snowfall at 10
o'clock today when the skies cleared
was 14 1-2 Inches, second only to the
ftorms of 1R9!) when 15 1-2 Inches fell,
and of ISfiS when 20.3 Inches fell. Eight-
een thousnnd men have been put to
work clearing the streets.
Mayor (Jaynor appeared nt the city
hall today, quite an If he had not fought
for his llfp in the gtorrrf last night. His
mrs were frostbitten Said the mayor
"We went through hardships that I
would not willingly encounter In my life
again. I very much regret the Injury to
my friend. Mr. fiheppnrd."
Mr. Sheppard, who fell off a railroad
trestle while fl^htln* the storm with
Mayor Gaynor, Is seriously 111 tonight.
His left lep and ankle were broken and
he suffered from shock and exposure. He
Is years old.
During tlie afternoon traffic conditions
1-egan to apnroach normal nRaln, though
there was still much congestion. Trans-
Atlanth* liners all reported savage
weather at sen. The thermometer
Capital's Exiraordi-
Bargain Offer
•>?- ?one year for $2.75,
5, three years $6.75,
f 0,00.
> not iidsire to taiic a Maya-
•a/.it J' u gdin offers, -.v« will
PRICE on the i ailv State Capita!
A.
t 2.76
.5 3.00
S 6.76
$10.0C
?3.50
S4.Cc
velv closes
?, 1910.
lhe Stale Capita! Company
OkU

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Greer, Frank H. The Oklahoma State Capital. (Guthrie, Okla.), Vol. 21, No. 226, Ed. 1 Sunday, January 16, 1910, newspaper, January 16, 1910; Guthrie, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc128092/m1/1/ocr/: accessed May 18, 2022), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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