The Enid Weekly Wave. (Enid, Okla. Terr.), Vol. 2, No. 43, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 24, 1895 Page: 4 of 8

I'itzkk and his whiskers are on a
itill h'int for the Rcnatonthip.
,
|
I
J
Tv.i ity-four inches of snow in New
York. Wliev.! Think .ind shiver.
'I'm; republicans don't take to the
idea i>. Heed beinp a presidential
«and id ate.
IT I•• okf as if Corbett and Fitzsira-
.aons ■■•an going to whip Gov. Clark
of Ar! insas.
Thi:.:k must have been an overflow
n the <rulf today. Hill 1 Solton was
billed to gn ■ athlng.
IT '- reported that the whiskers of
John L. Wiggins are stuck in a snow
iiaiul in Victor, Colorado.
A .TOMAN witness in the Dur-
; ant murder case at San Fransisco
actually refused to repeat what she
lad heard.
hxtilavauance and the increasing
of the public debt seems to be the
order of the day. Before election it
was economy and reform.
The Waukomis Wizard has been
•purchased by Frank Stevens, who will
continue the publication of the paper
«;mler the name of Woild.
f have no information about a de-
cline in the silver sentiment any-
where in the west, and I don't think
anybody else has. Dick Bland.
As we understand it no attempt
will lie made to disgrace the fair
name of Tennessee by pulling oil' a
prize fight within its sacred bounds.
'Vis well.
Thk Sac and Fox Indians will re-
ceive another payment of $21,000 in a
.tew days. The Sac and Fox Indians
mow number 523 persons, so this pay-
ment will give them ibout $40 per
capita. _________
Fitz is accused of wanting to crawl
out of the light with our .lim. Well
we see where be is right. We don't
<>lame him for wanting to preserve
*l«is face. If be ever meets .lim in the
•ring he will be defaced.
Guthrie seems to be making des-
ecrate efforts to Induce the managers
of Mie Corbett Fitsiinmons combina-
tion to have the fight there. The ef-
fort may result in giving Guthrie
«oine needed advertising.
An Ohio cockroach got lost on the
square today while walking around
i'or fresh air. As it had lived in that
iunsty Banner grocery, where Hop-
tfjee stays, we do not blame it for
wanting a change. It "no likee
Ohineeman."
There is only one way to make Enid
grow and that is foi everybody t<>
pull together. Quit throwing cold
water on everything that is proposed.
It won't beiu lit you or anybody else.
Let everybody commence working to
build u]i Enid.
David Ecker, sentenced to eighteen
months imprisonment at Norma" a
year ago for aiding prisoners to es-
cape, has beer pardoned by Governor
■Renfrow, the petition for executive
clemency being signed by Judge
Scott and other court official:-.
Oklahoma is fast taking on the el-
ements of statehood. Statehood is
uot for the benefit of a half dozen
politicians, but for the permanent
advantage of the inhabitants
of Oklahoma for all time to come.
The destinies of the future depend
upon placing the state of Oklahoma
upon a good sound basis.—Oklaho-
aian.
It is stated that the pelican at the
Blue Ribbon saloon is very fond of
kidneys. Next to toad frogs they
are Its favorite dish. When Hop-Lee
passes the window it opens wide its
twenty Inch bill and assumes a very
importunate position. It was detec-
ted eating a copy of the Chinese city
directory yesterday evening.
The following is going the rounds
of the papers: "Laying on of hands
for complaints, especially in children
is now taking the place of Christian
Science. A mother cured her boy of
the cigarette habit with one dose.
She laid her left hand on the boy's
neck, her right on a substantial slip-
per, and then applied the slipper
where it would do the most good. It
effected a cure and a relapse is not
looked for."
The indications are that Ohio,
New York and Iowa will give Un-
democratic candidates for the various
state oflices splendid majorities,
Everywhere the cry goes up against
the inefficiency and dishonesty of re-
publican officials and the people are
determined there shall be a change.
Republicans never had full sway In
national, state or county affairs
without demonstating their unfitness
to govern. The above states have
tried both parties and their decision
this fall Is anxiously looked for.
SEARCHED BY SPAIN.
An American Vessel Boarded by Span-
ish Troops.
Special to the Wave.
New Your,, Oct., 10. The He raid
will publish the following special from
Havana:
The American brigitine Harriet (1.,
which arrived at Nue Vitas a week
igo with a cargo of coal for the Por-
ta I'rlnclpe railroad, has been boar-
id in the bay and searched by an arm-
ed Spanish force, whose commanding
officer accused the vessel's master,
Captain Miller, of having brought
arm j and munitions for the rebels
and smuggled them ashore.
Captain Miller denied the charges
and protested against the outrage.
As nothing of a compromising nature
was discovered by the soldiers during
lie has filed a formal protest before the
United States commercial agent, to
be forwarded through Consul Gener-
al Williams to the state department
at Washington.
UNCLE RASTUS TALKS.
Sum fokes ax me why 1 left Missis-
sippi fur de strip. I'll jes tell ye.
Down dah de niggahs run ml county
an' town. I wus dah two yeahs an
da wus all jedges and kernels an
captins an sons ob jedges an kernels
an captins an wus all candits i'oah de
ven-huns l'ur offis. Sum ob dem
wood by de oddahs oil wif protnis ob
deptyshlps. So dat wen da wus
'lected dah wus moali deptys dan you
cood shake a stick at. All ob dem
had to be payed on taxes wasskeerse.
So dem cussed niggahs sole gold bon's
to git money furde offisers an de dep-
ths ;t 11 de clerks and de 'lection heel-
ers until de county wus eighty thous-
and dollahs in debt, de skool dees-
trict obali seben thousan' dollahs in
debt, de county seet town wus twenty
tliousan dollahs in debt, de townsite
hoard still rumains an sum back
counties to heah from. So 1 jist gib
up wlu:t I bed fur taxes an lef de
thieving niggahs an kiim to Enid j
where townsite boads, sity dads,
county 'lishals an skool drecters is
bonis. I tells you sail, Ise not to
blame fur leaviu'sich er set. I tells
you sail did not eben hab a coalhouse
outiu all dat money. Da had er jail
jist like a chikin coop wif a carel
around it wich de town marshal used
fur a dog poun'. It tell you dat no
eeesent man cood stay in dat county
sail. 1 had to kum to out heah fur
da wood steal ebery thing I cood
make.
NOW IS THE TIME.
Yes, right now: don't put it off!
There is a great drift of immigration
from the north and Oklahoma should
take advantage of the movement at
once, for the opportunity will not last
for every. Big changes of popula-
tion come only at intervals, and the
cities of Oklahoma should strive to
catch the fortune of the ebbing tide.
Let their Illimitable resources be I
published far and wide, so that the [
next two years will witness a mighty
exodus of people from the older state- ;
to link their destinies with those who ;
are already happy and affluent in the
imperial domain of Oklahoma.
MATTOX IN THE PEN.
The Noted Boy Murderer Placed in
the Penitentiary Yeslerday.
The gates of the Federal peniten-
tiary closed Sunday upon Clyde Mat-
tox, whose sentence of death was
commuted three weeks ago to impris-
onment for life. Marshal Neely yes-
terday transfered eight federal con-
victs to that institution, and among
these were Mattox, whose confine-
ment therein, was directed by the de-
partment of justice. Mattox has
nothing to say and was handcuffed to
a prisoner named Westfall, who was
sent up for one year and a day for
violation of the postal laws. The life
prisoner, when he arrived within the
prison walls, appeared to rather like
the change from the county jail, but
expressed no opinion. Being Sunday
the convicts were not furnished with
numbers, but will be provided with
that new title in the morning. Mat-
tox has no trade of any kind, and it
is possible that the warden will let
him select one of the few which the
convicts are engaged in within that
institution.
SOME men boast that they have no
politics. Such a boast is not meant
to be taken as true, however, unless
the man who makes it, aims to con-
vey the idea that he Is unable to
think upon the subject of civil gov-
ernment and upon what plan it should
be run to bring the most good to the
greatest number, or the greatest
good to the classes. F6r, upon one or
the other of these plans every gov-
ernment must be run. To say that
one does not care a bout politics is to
say that he cares nothing for his
country, nothing for his future, noth-
for the future generations, nothing
about the care of the poor, nothing
about the punishment of the murder-
er, nothing for the education of his
children, nothing about taxes, noth-
ing about commerce, nothing about
books and newspapers, nothing for
chastity and virtue, nothing about
tn jrals and religion, nothing about
phllantrophy or patriotism—he only
thinks of nothing. His mind is a
blank, and a blanket}' blank at that.
The idiot knows more than the man
who has no politics. He thinks of
government and avoids confinement
or arrest, submits to no restraint
save that of inability to perform what
his passions suggest. He rebels
against every other ruler save his
passions. His politics is, let every
man pitch in for himself and the
devil take the hindmost. Yet the
man who has no motto, no plan to fol-
low and no rule of action, is below
the mere idiot or madman. He is a
mental paralytic, lit only to eat
with the dunghill. The men who
amount to anything in life have po-
litical ideas as to how their city or
county, state or nation should be run
and they generally manage to let
their opinions be known. Such men
build cities, form empires, establish
commerce, extend civilization,
strengthen morality and religion
expand education, and enhance all
human comforts. The are the salt of
the earth.
BOLD HIGHWAYMEN.
Ma i Carrier Held up and Robbed
Near Guthrie.
The Crescent City mail t-arrier was
held Ui< and robbed by two masked
men Wednesday afternoon in the
sand hills north of the Cimarron
three miles out of Guthrie.
The men stepped from the woods
TRUE TO HIS RAISING.
A few d'lys ago the old saving "of i
vote the republican ticket and starve"
was thoroughly demonstrated tn the
writer. Along in the evening a seedy
looking farmo was passing our of-
fice and noticing our sign on the win-
dow, stopped, walked into the office
with bis hands behind liiin and re-
marked:
"Set still, I just come in too see j
and with leveled revolvers compelled how a democrat looked .,
the carrier to dismount. After rob- , llYou are a repubUcan then„ rcpUed
i the writer.
"Oh yes, I never voted anything
hut a straight republican ticket."
; "You never lived in Kansas—"
"Yes I did! I lived there live years
bing hiin of $3 they took the mail
sack and broke it open but did not se-
cure anything.
The robbeiB have been traced to
Guthrie and the officers are on their
track.
E'JGLARS AT" HENNESSEY.
Bugiars entered the store of the
Smith Hardware & Implement Com-
pany Saturday night and finding the
combination of the outer door of the
safe oil', they opened this and using
dynamite on the inner vault com-
pletely wrecked it. Onlv $22 in mon-
ey was obtained, but over $3,500 worth
of notes and warrants were taken.
The notes and warrants were found
near the railroad stock yards one-
half mile north of town. The bug-
iars broke into the Bank of Hennes-
sey and tried to open the vault but
failed, and after getting a trunk be-
longing to Cashier Stephenson and
securing $15they left.
A man up in Michigan had a depos-
it of $.">00 in a Landsing bank. There
came a run on the bank, and, fearing
its failure, he drew out his money.
The bank did fail and passed into the
hands of a receiver. The receiver
i?n brought suit against the man
wno drew the money on the grounds
that he k lew the bank was insolvent
r-nd viie law was that no depositor
iould have the advantage over an-
other. This leaves the case stand-
ing about thus: If you deposit your
money in a bank and the bank be-
comes insolvent and fails, you lose
your money because you don't know:
if you happen to discover that it is
insolvent and draw out your money,
lose it because you did know.
The following is the way the editor
of the Crosby County (Texas) News
will miss an issue or two: "The News
will not show up again for two or
three issues, because our children arc
all at school, where they "had ought"
to be, which leaves old dad to cut,
haul and stack the winter feed and to
get the News out , which he hasn't
'cutter.' But he can 'divide and con-
quer like the gold bugs are trying to
do in Texas, which the same he shall
do, beginning on the crop next week.
When we get our feed and wood in,
tlie News will begin it winter work.
Remember! There is mighty little
pay and lots of work in tills business,
and we have to manage as we do to
get along."
The final appraisment of the estate
of fhe late Jay Gould foots up the
sum of nearly $8.1,000,000, of which
$2,000,000 is in real estate, and the
rest is in various kinds of personal
property, mostly railroad securities.
This is probably the largest fortune
ever made in so short a time by spec-
ulative methods alone; and whatever
may be thought of the morality of
the man who made it, there can be
no doubt about his rare intellectual
power and his masterly grip of busi-
ness condition.
YOUR mouth is the front door of
your face. It is the aperture of the
cold storage room of your anatomy.
Some mouths look like peaches and
some like a hole chopped in a brick
wall to admit a new door or window.
The mouth is the hot bed of tooth-
aches, the bunghole of oratory and a
baby's crowning glory, it is the crim-
son aisle of your liver. It is patriot-
ism's fountain head and a tool chest
for pie. Without it the politician
would be a wanderer upon the face of
the earth and the cornetist would go
down to an unhonored grave. It is
the grocers' friend, the orator's pride
and the dentist's hope.
OKLAHOMA'S AMBITION.
Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma
are the three territorial orphans and
they all yearn for statehood. The
growth of Oklahoma has been phe-
nomenal. Governor Renfrow in his
report to the secretary of the Inter-
ior makes the assertion that Oklaho-
ma has a population of 275,000 pro-
gressive inhabitants, who will con-
tinue to knock at Uncle Sam's door
until it is opened or a panel gives
way. They are proud of their new
home, and as the taxable valuation
of the property is fixed at over
$38,000,000 it is evident that all their
boasts are not idle ones.—St. Louis
Chronicle.
_ j
A MOB'S VENGEANCE.
A mob in Tennessee simply cut off
the ears, nose, and fingers and
punched out the eyes of a negro rav-
isher, and then completed their work
by cutting off his head and stringing
him up by the feet, to a telegraph,
pole. The negroes henious crime
was that of brutally assaulting a lit-
tle twelve-year-old white girl by the
name of Bettie Pratev. The brutal
way in which this negt'o met his fate
should be a warning to all other
brutes in the future to "keep off the
grass." _______
NEW ORDER.
Marshal Nix has issued an order to
all the deputy niashals to comply
with the decision of Judge McAtee
regarding the ariest of a person
charged with a crime and the war-
rant gotten out before a commission
er living a county other than the one
in which the crime was committed.
He also orders all warrants issued un-
der such circumstances returned un-
served.
This order relates to the Fifth Ju-
dicial district only.
and liked to starved to death during
the time."
"You are living fi—"
"No I ain't. [ have just 00 cent and
i am going to buy some bacon and
corn meal with that. Last year I was
promised an office if 1 would vote the
republican ticket. I did and 1 havn't
had enough money to buy a pair of
overalls since. Wrell good-day, I'm
going down and see Shoemaker and
find out how the commissioners are,"
And as that fellow passed out the
door we noticed something resembling
the stars and stripes, partly conceal-
ed by his hands which were still
clasped behind. Keep on voting the
republican ticket and you will con-
tinue to five on bacon and corn bread
and bask in the moonlight while your
wife is sewing a slice of a gunny sack
in the seat of your pants.
EDITORS WHO DO NOT EDIT.
The following dispatch to the St.
Louis Republic would indicate that
the real editors of papers in the ter-
ritory have sent substitutes on the
press excursion to Texas:
"Galveston, Oct. 18—Today about
seventy-five ladies and gentlemen of
the Oklahoma and Indian territory
press association, which arrived last
night were given a delightful excur-
sion on the bay which included a full
view of the harbor improvements.
All were inspired with the import-
ance of this port as a gateway.
Among the most prominent visitors
are Hon. ,1. L. Isenberg, of the Enid
Daily Wave, Hon. H. J. Adams, of
the Kingfisher Free Press, Hon. T.
M. Green, editor and proprietor of
the Guthrie Capital, and M. L. Boyles
editor of the State Democrat at Nor-
man."
The truth in the matter is, J. V.
Admire is editor of the Kingfisher
Free Press, Frank Greer is editor of
the State Capital and Mort L. Bixler
i.s editor of the Norman Democrat.
Wonder if the boys got into a place
where they thought it best to regis-
ter under assumed names'?
THE LETTER HE WROTE.
A Stemwinder that Ought to Brought
The Girl to Terms.
The following is a copy of a letter
purported to have been written by a
young man who formerly lived here
to his best girl:
"Dearest.—My love is stronger than
the smell of coffee, or the kick of a
a young cow. Sens ations of exquisite
joy go through me like cohorts of
ants through an army cracker and
caper over my heart like young goats
over a stable roof. 1 feel as if I could
lift myself with .:>>• boot-straps to the
height of a church steeple, or like an
old stage horse in a green pasture.
As a mean pup hankers after sweet
milk, so do 1 hanker after your pres-
ence. And as the goslins swlmmeth
in a mud puddle, so do I swim in the
sea of delightfulness when you are
near me. My heart (lops up and down
like a churn dasher, and my eyes
stand open like cellar doors in a coun-
try town; and if my love is not recip-
rocated I will pine away and die like
a poisoned bedbug and you can come
and catch cold over my grave."
Ex-Senator Dawes, at a rccen
meeting of the Indian association in
New York, spoke of the Indian terri-
tory, depicting its strange and dis-
graceful condition. The Territory
was a form of government by itself,
independent of the United States.
The territory was now surrounded by
great states and immigration was
pouring in like a Hood. Some 300,000
white people are now living in the
territory; he said, but they have no
interest in so much as a foot of the
soil, and their children are excluded
from the schools. The Indians are
not luther advanced than they were
when they came to the territory and
they arc preyed upon by the white
man. It was time the government
The county commissioners are stiil
busy hearing appeal cases from the
county school superintendent, Zedi-
ker, in regard to his formation of new
school districts. His jerrymander of
the districts has cost the county a
great deal of money, given the citi-
zens a vast amount of annoyance and
expense without any visible profit.
Like the rest of the county officials
he bungled out to do something new
under the sun, regardless of expense
and trouble, and has succeeded. He
is like them in an another respect too
he is probably serving his last terir.
When men speak to boom a town,
they *pcak of times with a synonymus
with bulling and bearing the market.
Both are a species of gambling, the
stake to be furnished by suckers. No
city or country can be said to be truly
prosperous unless that prosperity is
brought about by good business
methods. Fictitious method create
fictitious wealth, which destroys con-
fidence, tinderminds public morals,
multiplies criminals and ultimately
brings disaster to the masses.
"To discontinue an advertisement,"
says John Wanamaker, "is like tak-
ing down your sign. If you want to
do business you must let the people
know it. I would as soon think of do-
ing business without clerks as without
an advertisement."
Is this an avalanche? Has another
land slide made its appearance?
These are questions suggested to poli-
ticians by tiie recent phenomenon at I took a hand in this matter. Gen:
Indianapolis. It may be a joke in- i Morgan, excommissioner of Ind'
tended for the diversion of Benny ! affairs endorsed what the senator had
Harrison, but if so it is a very seri-;said.
SHOT BY ACCIDENT.
The Old Story Over Again. -Two
Boys Shot By Accident.
Perky, O. T., -Oct. 18.—Yesterday
afternoon two boys living east of this
city about fifteen miles were shot
with a target gun. ft wasdischarged
just how it is not known, and Clark
Holly, fifteen years old, son of Colonel
Holly, is lying uncons;ious at the
point of death with a bullet hole
near his right eye.
When found lie was not yet uncon-
scious and told his father that the
shooting was accidental and done by
their hired hand, a German boy. The
boy who did the shooting has tied.
Young Holly cannot recover
Another and similar accident oc-
curred today southeast of the city in
'n Payne county. A young man
named Coots was fooling with a 3$
calibre revolver which was dis-
charged in some way, the bullet lodg-
ing in his head. Dr. Brengel cut the
bullet out of the boy's head and he
will recover.
REVIVAL IN THE GUTHRIE JAIL.
Successful Efforts of a Preacher in
Converting Lawbreakers.
As a result of revival meetings held
in the United States jail in Guthrie
last week by Rev. Dr. W. D. White,
pastor of the M. E. Church, South, a
most remarkable series of conver-
sions have been made, the converts
being Bill Raider, a noted outlaw
from the Osage country: .lim Blue,
held for pension fraud: Jake Wolse, a
member of the Wyatt gang of out-
laws: Bill January charged with rob-
bing the Plum postofflce: Riley Swee-
ney, charged with the murder of Jack
Phenis, and Miss Minnie Marshal,
held for contempt of court.
They were baptised in the Chris-
tian church Sunday afternoon, a
posse of deputy mashals being among
the audience to prevent any attempt
at escape.
ous one. It is calculated to produce
tears instead of laughter. Local
causes may have had something to
do with its production, but such a
swoop indicates a more potent power.
At all events, at the home of the ex-
president, the g. o. p. is effectually
stranded. It is high and dry. In
fact it is too dry and that may he in
part what ails it. Anyway, within
sight of the Hoosier capital it lies
sprawling with no one to do it rever-
ence. Among the chief mourners,
with bowed head and faltering step,
marches John C. New, the Harrison-
ian prophet. It Is seldom that in po-
litical life we hear a tale "so sad so
tender and so true."
We have failed to hear of the ut-
ter destruction of our manufacturing
industries and the starvation of em-
ployees under the Wilson act li>
stead we hear of factories starting
up everywhere, the wages of the em
ployees being voluntarily raised and
see a contented and happy laboring
class in all manufacturing centers.
Compare the present conditions with
those when the McKinlcy bill was in
force and ask yourself which of the
great political parties is right on the
tariff question.
The residents of the Indian ter
tory towns have begun to organize !,i
a way that will bring results. They
propose to secure titles to townsites,
if congress can be moved by reason.
At a convention at Ardmore a few
days ago a committee of three resi-
dents from each town in the nation
was appointed to lay the matter be-
fore congress in the form of a mem-
orial, together with a prospectus
showing how long the towns have
been in existence, the Indian and
white population of :ach ow the
number of business enterprises, the
products, etc. It was also decided to
send two representatives to Washing-
ton when congress convenes.
The democratic party is stronger
today in the doubtful states, New
York, Connetlcut. Ohio and Indiana,
than it was at the last presidential
election. The defeat of Tom Watson
in Georgia by a democrat having
1000 votes to spare, is pretty good ev-
idence that southern democrats have
not flopped to the pop side to any
alarming extent.
Frank Hills, city editor of the
Kansas City Journal, died at his home
on 1110 Wyandotte street, Sunday
at 12:30 p. m., of derangement of the
stomach. Mr. Hill has been engaged
in active repotorial and editorial
work in Kansas City for fourteen
years, and, being a quiet and unas-
suming man he made mlny friends,
who regret his loss deeply. His death
leaves a vacancy in the staff of the
Journal that will be hard to refill
He died, like most newspaper men,
with a clear conscience, having no
fear in meeting his Maker.
President Cleveland will be escort-
ed to the Exposition grounds at At-
lanta tomorrow by one of the most
imposing military processions ever
organized in the time of peace.
It will be composed almost entirely
of old historic organizations which
have stood the fire of four wars.
PRISONERS ESCAPE.
At Blackwell, O. T., yesterday, two
prisoners who were in charge of dep-
uty sheriff Cox, broke and run. The
excape was planed by Will Reynolds,
arged with burglary. They were
being taken to a livery stable were
it was i bought they could get thepro-
p to go on their bonds. Arriv-
L e they found two horses sad-
dled but not a soul was around. They
knocked the deputy down, took his
pistol and offering to kiss him good-
bye, mounted the horses and hurried
away. No effort was made by the of-
ficer to capture the men.
When the city council undertakes
to run the school board they step over
the bounds of their authority. Few
members on it are the choice of the
people and the stink they are trying
to raise is repugnant to the citizens
of Enid. With the ecomomical
wheels buzzing in their head, they
commence to dictate to the school
board what they shall do and what
they must not do, and in consequence
of their efforts to save the city un-
necessary expense, the public schools
of Enid are in a good condition to be
closed. The howl they made on the
clerks salary has placed the school
board in a position where they can-
not pay any of their obligations.
The score of offers to do the clerks
work for $5 per month went into ob-
livion when those who had the propo-
sions in for that amount found that
their honesty had to be hacked up
b a gilt edged bond for $1,000. Not
o le of the economical lunatics who
compi se the city council would do
the work for that amount, and yet
they howl for economy. They would
rather see their children loafing on
the street corners, visiting the places
of immoral resorts and learning every
kind of meanness, than to have them
in the school rooms, where every in-
fluence known is brought to bear to
make them respected boys .and girls
in the community in which they live

Upcoming Pages

Here’s what’s next.

upcoming item: 5 5 of 8
upcoming item: 6 6 of 8
upcoming item: 7 7 of 8
upcoming item: 8 8 of 8

Show all pages in this issue.

This issue can be searched. Note: Results may vary based on the legibility of text within the document.

Tools / Downloads

Get a copy of this page .

Citing and Sharing

Basic information for referencing this web page. We also provide extended guidance on usage rights, references, copying or embedding.

Reference the current page of this Newspaper.

Isenberg, J. L. & Isenberg, Edna A. The Enid Weekly Wave. (Enid, Okla. Terr.), Vol. 2, No. 43, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 24, 1895, newspaper, October 24, 1895; Enid, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc111614/m1/4/ocr/: accessed March 20, 2019), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

International Image Interoperability Framework (This Page)