The Enid Weekly Wave. (Enid, Okla. Terr.), Vol. 1, No. 8, Ed. 1 Saturday, February 3, 1894 Page: 3 of 8

The Wive
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J. W. Steen and fami/jt arrived in
the city Tuesday brpging with
them their household golds to estab-
lish a home in Enid.
Henry Ryan needs coftertion worse
than anj' man we knov of in this
country. He says thatpe is fatten-
ing a large herd of hojjs out at his
farm with strip corn.
Captain Hassler will fever be satis-
tied until a flag waves over the court
house square. He threatens to put it
up at his own expense if somebody
else dont move in the matter soon.
The ladies of Enid seems to look
pleasant and enjoy life in their new
rustic homes here. Many of them
left large roomy houses to come here
and li\ e in two, three and four small
rooms.
A fine quality of building stone has
been found seven miles west rf the
city in abundance. It is known in j
this country as "red rock" but in this !
instance it is much harder t.ian the I
general run of that kind of scone.
The land office is chuck full of
lawyers and their clients, Three
cases are being tried at a time and
the warm speeches as they echo
through the building riminds one of
a contesting debating societies in a
country school house.
A stranger, whose name we failed
to get, was figuring among the build-
ers Tuesday for estimates on a
building 32x100 feet, three stories
high, to be erected on E street some-
where. Thus they come and quietly
go to work improving the city.
The farmers already on their
claims are turning the sod at quite a
lively rate and quite an acreage of
corn, oats and barley will be planted.
Owing to recent rains the ground is
in good condition and quite a crop
will be harvested this first year of
the settlement.
The population of Enid is increas-
ing at a rapid rate. The road from
the station to the city is constantly
full of teams and drays hauling
household goods for the families
moving in. Houses cannot be built
fast enough for the accomodation of
the people and rents are fearfully
high.
Some careless citizen spit on the
Kock Island railroad track the other
day. The very next day the red tank
addition kicker came out and said
that the track had been greased.
Why, Whitaker old boy, there is not
a man in Enid who cares enough for
the meanness of that railroad to
waste the least particle of grease on
it.
Mable Humphrey, a young lady re-
siding twelve miles east of Guthrie,
attempted suicide last Saturday by
swallowing a dose of corrosive subli-
mate. She was discovered in time
and given an emetic which cheated
the grave out of its victim. The
young lady gives as the cause for her
rash act as being sick and despondent
and wanted to die. With proper
treatment she will recover.
THE TARIFF III!.I..
Washington, Jan. 28.—The Wilson
tariff bill has emerged frora the ordeal
of amendments to which it had been
su jected the last two weeks and is
now in its perfected form so far as the
house can perfect it The additional
days of debate next week will bo given
exclusively to the income tax. It has
been so difficult to keep track of the
different amendments from day to day
that the ways and means committee
have not copies of the perfected bill.
Of the two material alterations in
the bill—sugar and wool—that on su-
gar is of far reaching consequence.
The committee had decided to gradu-
ally extinguish the sugar bounty by
taking a part off each year for eight
years. But the radical anti-sugar ele-
ment succeeded in passing their amend-
ment doing away with the bounty at a
single stroke. The radicals also amend-
ed the bill so that refined sugar, as
well as raw, goes on the free list
The wool amendment changes the
bill so that free raw wool and reduced
duties on manufactured woolens go
into effect as soon as the tariff bill be-
comes a law. The bill had fixed Au-
gust 1 as the date for free raw wool to
take effect and December 1 as the date
for the reduced duties on manufactured
woolens. But the radical element
would accept no delay and, as a result,
there is no postponement of da es in
the woolen schedule. The difference
of four months between free raw wool
and reduced duty on manufactured
wool was given in order to allow the
trade to adjust itself to the change.
Among the lesser amendments made
are those raising the duties on dia-
monds from 10 per cent under the bill
to SO per cent and the specific repeal
of the reciprocity clause of the McKin-
ley bill.
Representative Burrows (rep.), of
Michigan, says: "The republican
members of the house will have no
caucus on the tariff or income tax
questions. Neither have they agreed
on a policy. There is no need of an
affirmative policy. We are simply pas-
sive while the majority proceeds to
execute its commission. We recog-
nize it would be futile for us to at-
tempt to execute any affirmative
policy. We have offered amendments,
but they have failed of recognition, or
have been defeated by the majority.
What need therefore, is there on our
side of the house of a policy? We will
quietly wait while the other side fur-
nishes the policy."
The house committee on rules has
agreed to an order allowing the income
tax to be offered as an amendment to
the tariff bill, giving Monday and
Tuesday for general debate and Wed-
nesday for debate and amendments
under the five minute rule, with gen-
eral debate in the evenings, the vote
to come on the tariff bill and amend-
ments Thursday at noon.
Judge Brad e/ Robbed.
Some time during Tuesday Judge
Bradley's office was entered and his
vest, watch and money to the amount
of $125 was taken, on retiring Mr.
Bradley failed to lock his room door
in the Fuqua block, hence the robber
had easy access. There was one man
arrested but there being no proof
against him he was discharged.
There in no clue to the robber.
A Lively Convention.
The citizens of the north addition
met in convention Tuesday to nomi-
nate town trustees. A citizens'
ticket was nominated to be voted
upon February 7. During the meet-
ing the affairs of the present tempo-
rary government was brought up. It
seems that one man has been acting
mayor, marshal, clerk, policeman
and dog catcher and that there has
been about $500 collected and unac-
counted for. The air was charged
with considerable feeling and the
presumption is the mayor, etc,, etc.,
will be compelled to ditf up or dig out.
The City Council.
The city council met Tuesday for
the first time for several days. Nu-
merous bills were presented and the
most of them referred to committees,
but a few of them were not allowed
on account of the city attorney's de-
cision declaring them illegal. Mr.
Tyler, of Indianopolis addressed the
council on the subject of waterworks
and electric light, giving some very
favorable statistics in regards to the
cost of running such plants and show-
ing plainly that the city could build
said works and pay for them in a few
HOY ANI> HIS GUN.
He Peppers tlie Terlton* Attending n
I'l^eon shooting: Match
Glen Cove, L. I., Jan. 28.— At a
pigeon shooting match held near this
village a dozen men were shot by a
youth who wai outside the lines watch-
ing for escaping birds. The wounded
men were standing around the plat-
form where I)r. D. B. Doughty, of Cold
Spring Harbor, and Stephen W. Hen-
drickson, of Sea Cliff, contestants in
the match, were firing The match
was for twenty-four birds a side and
Dr. Doughty fired at his twenty-
third bird, which he missed.
As the bird flew over the
boundary line, a boy, whose identity
could not be established, raised his gun
to snoot it The bird turned and flew
back toward the ground, and the boy
fired. The charge of shot went direct-
ly into the crowd and for a few mo-
ments there was considerable excite-
ment. It was thought at first that
some one had been killed. There were
two physicians on the grounds who
hastened to the relief of the injured
and found that while the wounds were
painful, none were dangerous.
Alleged I'cuce In tirazil.
Buenos Aybes, Jan. 28.—Dispatches
received here from the Associated press
correspondent at Rio de Janeiro to-
day announce that in all probability
Rear Adm. Benham, in command of
the United States fleet in those waters,
has, after communicating with the
United States government at Washing-
ton, succeeded in arranging terms sat-
isfactory to the government of Presi-
dent Peixoto as well as to the insurgent
commander and that the rebellion is
most likely at an end.
Mippnsea nuiciae.
Lawrence, Kan., Jan. 28.—The body
of a man, identified as Frank Kramer,
of Lawrence, Neb., was found under
the ice near the river bank. There
were two uuly wounds under his lower
jaw which might have been mads with
a piece of iron. Indications, however,
point to suicide.
A Hiiiidit Succumb*.
St. Louis, .Ian. 2 8.—Post Office In-
spector Johnston has received word
that Willis Brown, a member of the
Seminole band of train robbers, who
was shot at the capture of the gang
last Tuesday ne ir Vinita, died las*
uight at Fort Smith, Ark.
TEKIXG COLLATES.
ttourkf < Of Until i linlii Little Support tn
His right Ag.tlnnt Income x
Washington, Jan. 28.—After the
reading of the journal in the house,
Mr. Haines, of New York, made the
point of no quorum and the speaker
ordered the roll called. This was in
pursuance of a policy decided upon by
the New York members to filibuster
against an order from the committee
on rules extending the tariff debate
and authorized the offering of the in-
ternal revenue bill as an amendment
to the tariff bill. The call developed
the presence of 181 members and the
filibustering came to an ignominious
collapse.
The speaker recognized Mr. Outh-
waite, of Ohio, from the committee on
rules and he reported the special order
for the Wilson bill and income tax
amendment providing for a vote there-
on February 1 and he demanded the
previous question.
The opponents of the income tax re-
alized their helplessness and did not
even make a show of resistance. Mr.
Cockran, of New York, however,
suggested a slight modification of
the order, so as to close general
debate on the internal revenue amend-
ment on Tuesday. To the other terms
of the order he had no objections.
"We can make but a poor show of re-
sistance, " he said, "against both the
friends and enemies of the main bill
who have uniteil on the income tax
proposition and this slight modification
is all we ask."
Mr. Hatch, of Missouri, loudly de-
manded the regular order and, al-
though appealed to. refused to with-
draw it Without further ado then the
special order was adopted.
The house then resolved itself into
committee of the whole and the con-
sideration of the tariff bill was re-
sumed, the pending amendments being
those relating to the lumber schedule.
Mr. Doolittle (rep.. Wash.) made a strong
plea for the substitution of the lumber
schedule of the present law for that of
the Wilson bill. Free lumber, he said,
would force the laborers of his state
into competition with the cheap Chinese
and Japanese labor employed across
the Canadian line.
Mr. Hayes, (dem.), of Iowa, who said
he represented one of the largest lum-
ber districts in the country and which
contained the largest saw mill in the
world, maintained that there was no
fear of Canadian competition among
the lumbermen. He had investigated
the whole question thoroughly and it
was simply a question of stumpage.
KANSAS RAILWAY WAGES.
Average I'ay Per Diem of the Different
Employes.
Topeka, Kan., Jan. 28.—HI. D. Hen-
derson, secretary of the state board of
railroad commissioners, has given to
the state printer the board's annual re-
port and it will be ready for distribu-
tion in a few days. An interesting
part of it is the average daily wages
paid as reported by the several railroad
companies of the state. Reports are
made for all the roads, including branch
lines, but the more important are the
figures given by the trunk line compa-
nies, as follows:
Auhlsou, Topeka & Santa Fe averages-
General officers. 111.-0 a day tfeneral office
clerks, .3 station agents, 1178. engineers,
54 h firemen. $1*8 conductor*, $184; other
trainmen, machinists, 12.06; carpenters,
other shopmen, $1.75: section foremen,
$l.'3: other trackmen. $127: switchmen, $2 6H;
tcUgraph operators $1.97: total average, $1.94.
Cmcago Hock Island & Pacific General
officers (only one In the state), $!■. >6 general
. fflce clerks, $3 62: station agents. $i ¥5; en-
gineers $4. .1 firemen, $ .60; conductors, 13.94;
other tr.iinxnon, 2.25; machinists, $2 07; car-
penters, $. 13 other shop men $1.t&; section
foremen, JL83 other trackmen. $1.24: switch-
men. *2.51 telesrranh operators, $2.32. Total,
51 99.
Chicago, Burlington &, Qulncy—General offic-
ers. $1 .41 (.:• n t:i offlca clerks, $261; station
surent , }1.67 engineers, 2.89; firemen. $1.70:
couau i :•••. - 93; otaer trainmen, $l 7/ ma-
oinla's, $2.1«: carpenters, $2.05; other shop-
mi n, I .4: section foremen, $! 9; other track
men, H. ifl; switchmen, $1.85 teh graph opera-
tors, 11.82. Total, «1.7 f.
LC.it.svs Cii\\ Springfield Memphis—Gen •
er: l officers, $10. gene al office clerks. $2 46.
s'arlufi ugeuts, $1 59 engineers $1: firemen,
j$;2 : cou iuctors, $3.17 other trainmen. 1 9J
machinists, $-' f« carpenters, 2.25. other shop-
iron, J2 i'4 section foremen, $1.68: other track-
men. $i.3l. swito men, 2.3J; telegraph oper-
i io k $!. . Total $1.99
Union Pacific—General officers, $9.87: g neral
111 eil ras. $ i)9. station agents, $2.08 engi-
neers, f -7 firemen, $1.45 conductors, $t 87
other trainmen, ;?2.i>. machinists, $3 2*. car-
penters, other shopmen, $-.3J; section
f- ;• me . .1.9' other trackmen, $1 4i>; switch-
man, 215 telegraph operators, $2.11 Total
Missouri, Kansao & ex is General officers,
il'6 : general oOflO Clerkd, 4 >; station
arents. $.'.41 cn in • -rs. : 0 firemen. $.\2l:
conductors, i.il oth r trainmen, $201 ma-
elrinists, $2.<H carpenters, i other shop-
men. $1.81; section foreman, *1 71: other track-
mi n, .1.1 ; switchmen, $J II. telegraph oper-
tors, 2.07. Total >1 vj
These averages are not the average
wages paid daily by the year, but by
the number of days each employe
worked.
• lioe Factories Horned.
St. Louis, Jan. 29.—Fire to-day com-
pletely destroyed the five-story building
occupied by Western Hoot and Shoe Co.
and IJernard-Gannon Shoe Co., on Olive
street between Eighteenth and
Nineteenth with all contents. The
WHITING & LftlNG,
ATTORNEYS J^LflW
E ST., ENID. O. T.
Special attention to land business before
the local'office and Interior Departnicut.
Idwtf
L. M. CON K LING . J. W. STERN,
I. G. COCKLING
Gonkliiuj, Steen & Gonlino,
LAWYERS.
Federal and Territorial Court practice and
Land Office business. Rooms 1 and 2, Fuqua
building, Enid, O. T. Idw3m
T. W. WftMPLtR,
Law anil Land Attorney,
ENID, O. T.
Will practice in all the Courts, and before
the IT. S. Land Office and thu Departments at
Washington. dw
STEVEN H. JECKO,
- DeutsGlier fldvokat. •
een years experience. Examiner of Town-
site and Contested Cases in the
General Land Office.
Offick: Opposite Land Office, ENID, O. T.
Dr. W. A. HERING
® ® DENTIST.
All Work Fullu Warranted.
Office: Kant of Lund Offlre, - - ENII), O. T.
Denton <§ Chambers,
ATTORNEYS ftT LAW,
ENID, O- X.
Practice in all Courts. Land Office business
carefullv attended to. Kooms 14 and 15, Fu-
qua building. Idwtf
C. J. GEORGE,
Physician and Surgeon
ENID, O. T.
Enid office east Land Office upstairs.
ROBBERTS k UltOWNI.EK,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
enid and kinofisi1eh.
C. Uobiiruts, late register of U. 8. Land
Office, Kingfisher, Ok. W. K Hhowni.kk, for-
merly register U. S. Land Office, Lamed, Kas.
ldwlm
DHAH. KING,
DEALER IN
Furniture and CarpetsJ
Lounges, Bedroom Suits, Oilcloths, Leno-
liums. Desks, Office Chairs, Window
Shades, G-lassware, Queensware,
Undertakinu and tmbalminu a Specialty The Leading Furniture Deaiei
!dw
J. C. KELLY
C. K. METLERl
J. G. KELLY & GO.
Successors to J. R. GREGG & CO.
Colorado Saloo
E STREET.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL LIQUOR DEALERS,
JOHN C. MOORE,
Lawuer and Land fltiornei
ENID, OKLAHOMA.
G. J. f>LDHRBUR6.
® Merchant Tailor]
Fashionable Tailoring. Cleaning and KcpairinK neatly done. Agent for Wanumakerl
Brown. North of Square, Enid O. T. ldv|
(flee business a Specialty.
C. B. WEEKS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ENID, O. T.
Office east of U. S. Land
H. A. YONGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ENID, O. T.
all courts of the Territory and be-
fore the Land Office and Interior Department
at Washington. Office east side of square.
Idw
G-. M. PARKS,
Real Estate and ♦ *
♦ * Collection Agent.
Opposite Land Office—East Side.
S8d7w
W. H. OLD,
Racket and second-hand store
Tinware, Stoves, Nails and Household G-oot
of every kind and description.
North 3rd street, Enid, O. T.
N. T. SNYDiEK, Manager. E. JANSSEN, Conveyancer;
Enid Real Estate and
investment Gompan
COR. E AND .'lltn Sth., ENID, O. T., west of Postoffice.
We buy and sell real estate, locate
stracters of O county.
claims and do a general land office business. \
Jd*
J. V, KAKESTHAW, AUCTIONEER.
d. E. KEMP, Civil. Enq
fAIGDfty, PATTE.N&STURGIS
lav; and real estate.
Contests and Land Office practice. Office
south side of Square, opposite Land Offic
Enid, O. T. Idwtf
a. j. jones. j. l. wic
JONt-S & WIGGINS,
Law 8c Land Atty's.
ENID, O. T.
Practice before the Land Office and the De- '
partment at Washington. Contests and ap-
peals :: specialty. Latest information con-
(■••rnliig Sehool Lands. Office, front room In
Fuqua Building, upstairs. Idwtf
RAKESTRAW, KEMP&CO.
Real Estate aim insurant
Civil Enflineeriiio and Surveyino.
OFFICE UPSTAIRS, I
Rakestbaw & Rouse building, i
ENID, C
CHAS. H. CODDING,
Civil Engineer
and Surveyor,
ENID, O. T.
6d8w
1)15. 15. A. BROWN,
Subscribe for
Kou*
ENID, O. T.
■ & Uakestraw building.
NOHFFSINOElt & NAOLE,
4(1 w
A ll>&ii<lrtotiie < hureli (turned.
Louisville, Ivy., .Ian, '30.—St. Paul's
Episcopal church, the largest and
wealthiest church in the city, burned
this morning. Loss, $100,000; insur-
ance, $54,000.
Attorneys at Law,
KINGFISHER, O. T.
I'KLKUIl A I'll IC HICK VI TI ICS.
Jim Morrison, who escaped from the
Pratt mine prison in Tennessee a few
days ago, killed a deputy shorliT who
was trying to arrest him and escaped.
The court lias ordered that the testi-
years. He was ready to make a prop- monV I" the trial of the train robbers
• . . . : . . ' : ; at Newport, Ark., be not published
oaitlon to put in water and electric m)U1 t,£ Uat pl.isoIll!I. ,8 pUoe(, on
OR. GUNN'S
Bernard-Gannon Co.'a loss is & Surgeon,
stock and machinery; the Western com-
pany's loss is $50,000, and Thomas Key-
burn, owner of the building', loses $35,- j
000. All losses fully insured. The;
cause of fire is unknown.

Neuator Stewart Oliji'ctM.
I Washington, Jan. 29.—In the sen-,
! ate Mr. Stewart introduced a resolu-
tion declaring that in the judgment of!
the senate Secretary Carlisle was not i
clothed with the legal authority to
issue bonds.
C'Hfllilfr Kramer >i Suicide.
Lawrence, Kan., Jan. 30.—The cor-
oner's jury this morning found that |
Frank Kramer, the bank cashier,
whose body was discovered with
throat cut Saturday, committed sui-
cide. He left Wakenda, Mo., Friday
afternoon on his way to Carbondale
and must have left the 11 o'clock train
here and committed the deed at once.
Rx-Coiigr«>Hniiinii < ulklim Dead.
Tacoma, Wash., Jan. 30.— Judge
William H. Calkins died this morning
of liright's disease, aged 52. Judge
Calkins was a member of congress from
Indiana from 1870 to 188*3.
THE ENID WAV
The best evidence of a city's prosperity is a popular, progressive p.
I'. SI'ENCKIt, I'llksiukxt.
II. I\ Itl KKlNOTON,!
fof! COUClis:
COLDS
and cnouy
GRANDMOTHER'S ADVK
la rttWn* « fnmllT nliR olXMwn. "P'l' r
i-Jv fr >• CouHhs, Cold • «nd ' i-OTp 'o ' • " •
is fr"*" . 21 IS, o^i!" VI ■■
Sold by J. B. McFarland, Druggist.
O County Belli
( PAIh-TP CAPITAL, *10,000,00;
Exchange issued on Local and Foreign ]
Collections, etc., made a Specialty.
REFERENCES i
Missouri National Bunk Kunwis city; I'list National Hunk. Kl Kimo; Hank
KlnxIWirr, Okluliomu. Assetts of Individual tiropitotor*of tin- Itank, 1100,000.110
light works if the council was readj
to receive such proposition. The
matter was referred to the ways and
means committee in conjunction with
the committee on fire, light and
water.
trial.
The body found in Cumberland river
below Clarksville, Tenn., bus been
identified us that of Henry Ilnteheson,
and John Senseny has been arrested
for the murder.

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Isenberg, J. L. The Enid Weekly Wave. (Enid, Okla. Terr.), Vol. 1, No. 8, Ed. 1 Saturday, February 3, 1894, newspaper, February 3, 1894; Enid, Oklahoma. (gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc111537/m1/3/ocr/: accessed November 21, 2018), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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