Oklahoma State Register. (Guthrie, Okla.), Vol. 15, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 22, 1906 Page: 6 of 8

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OKliATIOMA STATE RLGlsTfcrt
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flKb
GAM
BY
J.S.TRIGG
REGISTER.
DES MOfNES.lA.
CORRESPONDENCE
50LICITED
Old AfTsfotle knew tliut «■ 1 •
fertilizer for the farm, aurtli
ileail :i loll,', loug time.
*SK
it wfth !<
has been
Ti!
It is (lie March mil
era that make the D
Winter layers.
■arly April lay-
[•eniher find nil
A great many tin 's, Jl|fe lots of folks,
linve very well ilefiuoil antipathies as
1o certalu person*, the wlieiv.'ore In
bolli <- i: -s being in a measure- uuex-
plnlnaljle.
Wo ran the risk of the frost last sea-
foii with a small patch of sweet corn,
planting about April 10, and as a re-
sult hud an early supply. It was a
speculation and chanced to turn out all
right.
Is it economy to let stock run at will
to hay and eat and waste lhat which
lias cost so much hard work to secure?
Hotter feed it in the barn or lot and
put the manure back on the land where
it is most needed.
We know of a number of Instance.-
in which the housewife, assisted by tli
children, has conducted a carelul test
Jng of the seed corn. It Is pretty sale
to assume that when mother under-
takes the job it will be well and thor-
oughly done.
riive your bo
the garden pat
letling them ha
from it. Itesid
tlve than a ga
i and girl a portion oi
•h to tend this season,
\*e what they can make
>h being a better incen-
d it inculcates a very
> making of prontab! ■
ly possible with high
of the strictly beef br
near the $'
by a que'
erlod.
Mali
of tile purchase of gilts
mark shouM be followed
in mark rather than a
■ It as warm as [
arrows which xc;
your premises, and
Spam
birds
alble for all
a home ou
hi will have lots of
s are pirates.
If a young couple ooromcnce picking
.1113 every old thing In the
i out of it which they think
Into play nine day, they will
tip if.
lion Si'
may i
d
side i
i fire to help
if ten years.
tliei
iii-
nan on the
[• nice boys
if them with
,vork as the
..wry it on.
farm is the
>arly resolves to stay by his
We feel sorry for the
farm who has raised t'o
and cannot keep even one
him to take up the farm
father grows too old to
The smartest boy on the
one who
dad.
valuable habit of industry and so
of ownership.
It would lie a good time any of these
frosty mornings to take your railroad
iron and break down those stall'
Then when a soft day comes liitch on
to the disk, set it straight and go cross-
ways of the field and you will have tilt
job well done.
Vir lumbar, which a few years ago
was used sparingly. Is becoming so
HCiirce and hard to get that a merchant
stated to us a few days ago he had to
I tog for it with the money in his hand
to pay for it, and then shipments are
very much delayed.
A swarm of sparrows, a flock of pi-
geons, a wandering dog, an old black
crow or a predatory wolf visiting an
infected bogyard can transmit the chol-
era with as much certainty as could a
diseased hog running at large, and
these agencies are pretty hard to quar-
antine against.
Nothing makes a prettier lawn deco-
ration than a circular bed, say twelve
feet In diameter, witli a dozen cannas
in the (enter and these banked with
t!i ■ different varieties of the colons. A
fringe of dwarf nasturtiums may be
set ou the extreme outer edgo of the
bed with good effect.
Along the 11si of March we :.e| a few
sm:111 b-i\es, till them with e.irih and
sow some celery, cabbage, peppers, to-
i :o"s, pmislos and e'her desirable
things. Then in May wo have a nice
lot of BtrOUff plants to set out in the
garden without having to buy or beg
them from the neighbors.
o flowers grown
•TO more lovely or lo
vi> n larger measure
iiioa than a lied of
plant
lie ei
last summer
ager lived or
of real satls-
asters. The
■i may lie bought, but may also
sily raised from the seed, then
>1 111 tile be.l When of ; utticic.it
To have ample room they should
t about lift ecu lie lies apart each
way
A judge of an Iowa court lias recent-
ly ruled that the owner of a hive of
liees which stung a passing team and
oausrd them to run away was liable
for the damage that resulted, llils is
somewhat contrary to the "wild ani-
mal" conception of the bee.
t ——-
j"be Duroe-Jersey i traveling in the
same path as did Its predecessor, the
lJoland-< 'hina. it is in danger of being
killed by its loving friends by being
ijred too fine. Hemembei: tbat a hog
should always remain a hog, sturdy
sinil substantial He should have a leg
on each of his four corners, not broom-
sticks. Iion't try to produce a rose.
The sowing of a certain portion of
'the farm area to clover Is coining to
be looked upon as a regular feature
of tin' enriy spring work by all Intel
Jigent and progressive farmers. Four
of timothy and two of clover
;own with the oats, or, if
>11111','.
We find that peas of all kinds do bet-
ter sown early than wli ' i sown at reg-
ular intervals durin:; the spring, de-
pending upon tile difference in time of
maturing of tli > several varieties to
alV'ird a succession of pickings, i eas
like cool, moist conditions while dcvel-
l'or a family garden we would
about four kinds, which, if prop-
erly selected, will give a good supply
of peas from the middle of -IIIlie to the
last of July.
While making a drive recently the
r.vcrvinan pointed out a farmhouse to
where ho had been called by the
owner a few days previous to shoot
:ui aged mare because, he said, she "'as
not lit to work any more. She had
been in the family upward of twenty
3nd had raised a colt every year
but one since she was five years old -
most, l'altlifnl creature these many
• irs. The man might just as consist-
ntly have shot his grandfather.
quarts
*houkl be
clover
Mill l <
alone Is desii
found suftU'ieii
ti, tbrei
with ti:
quarts
oats.
scovor.v wine
import jiniv
will pr
to tlu? <1
f sts of the country aud iudin
huimm family is that
the German seleutlst,
lirnls Inoculated with
o of I ju-
ry i uter
; ly to tin
Von Bering
hereby dairy
sped tic virus
;tro rendered Immuuo to tuberculosis.
ITlie further claim is also mado that
jieoplo using milk and cream from
suoh immuuized coavs arc thcmsel
rendered proof against the ravages of
the disease.
Timber tracts aud groves of all sorts
may be v t.v greatly benefited by an iu
telUgent id judicious thinning out and
trimming up. Trees easily hamper each
other's growth, aud nil weak and rie
formed specimens should be removed
A serious f ay It with n ««rly all artltlcl*al
groves lies in the too thick planting of
the tree?, somelhiug which is not nO'
tired when the trees are young, but
prttfeb, if not edrrected, mftjr result in
the ruin of the ^rove at a later period
ftunlJght and air are absolutely India
|)ensa(jle to the vigorous and licdlthy
growth of nil forost aud orchard trees'
So serious ha
forest fire* in
lhat one «• >i
nugurated a
protection a
rf the foresi
ii the losses from
a portion* of California
pany nt M'Cloud has in
'aiup iign for efl'ectIvo lire
Mrding t<* the suggestion
service of the department
The plan co
The owner
ui abuntianCi
tit ting the s<
many as are
tart lie* in tli
danger of frc
of tin) garden may have
of early cucumbers by
4 m1 In a piece of sod as
d ired for the hill—and
house or hotbed. When
st Is over the sod should
trausfenvd t< the ground, care be-
taken not to disturb the roots.
Vines started in this way will set
iliead of the striped bugs and will
furnish a supply of cucumbers for the
table two or llmv weeks earlier than
by the usual method.
What were the waterlogged soils of
the prairie west In the sixties? Soils
which would then starve out any man
who attempted to cultivate tlieui are
now the richest and best lands to be
found in all that country. Impaction
the spongy surface by continuous
pasturing, surface drainage by way of
the cultivated field, the working of the
highways, the building of the rail-
ways and co-operative drainage ef-
forts In the wetter sections have com
pletely reclaimed these lands and
made of them soils as productive as the
valley of the Nile.
The strawberry bed should bo set out
when you plant potatoes—about the
middle or last of April. Ground to be
used for the bed should be free from
weed seeds i and should be put In good
llltli before the plants are put out. «Jet
your plants from some one In your Im-
mediate vicinity or from your nearest
rvman. l'er the ordinary garden
I'l.lMIMl AN ORCHARD.
It may be tbat sonic of tlu; readers
of these notes are planning lo put out
ni< orchard this spring, large or small,
as the i .'ise may lie. A few suggestions
gained from practical experience may
be of assistance in doing the work so
as to secure in a measure satisfactory
I results. First, the varieties planted
should be few and should be secured
on tlie recommendation of your nearest
reliable nurseryman. When stock is
bought from a distant firm or or an
Itinerant peddler whose location is un-
known, there i < danger that trees may
prove not only unsulted to your lati-
tude, but nli untrue to name. Almost
any soil that will proituce an abundant
Held crop will be found suitable for
orchard purposes. The location is a
matter of secondary Importance, al-
though It Is usually considered that a
northeast slope Is preferable for tlie
purpose. The writer lias found that a
belt of timber skirting his orchard on
the west and south lias served as a
splendid wind break and been the
means of saving a large amount of
fruit tiiiit would otherwise have been
blown from the trees. The ground
should be put into good condition be-
fore the trees are planted, and if the
orchard plan is a large one—an acre
or more—the hard work of planting
may lie greatly lightened by a plowing
of l arrows ot a good deptli iu which
the trees may be planted. They should
be set in rows north and south, which
provides protection from the sun when
they have attained any size. If they
are set so as lo form rows east and
west the cultivation of the orchard
for the first few years is greatly fa-
cilitated. The trees should be planted
from twenty-five to thirty-five feet
apart each way, dependiug somewhat
upon tlie variety, and lie set iu the
earth from five to six inches lower than
they stood in tlie nursery and should
tilt slightly to the southwest, the ob-
ject of this being to have the tree shade
Its own trunk (luring the hottest por-
tion of the afternoon.
During an experience covering sev-
eral years we have found that the
greatest source of danger to the or-
chard and particularly to young trees
is the root borer. The beetle lays its
eggs on tlie trunk of tlie tree just
above the surface of the ground (lur-
ing May anil early June, anil these
hatch during the month following, the
baby borers being so small as to be al-
most Invisible. They work in tlie tree
near the place of entrance the tirst
season, bore down and to one side the
second year and early In the third take
an upward course, emerging from tlie
tree during tlie latter part of May and
.1 imo at ti point three or four Inches
above the ground through a perfectly
round hole about an eighth of an inch
in diameter. If the borer is not dis-
covered because of grass or earth
about the trunk, the fate of the tree is
practically sealed. Three borers in a
live-year-old tree will kill it outright
in three years or will at least weaken
it ho it becomes tlie inevitable victim
of the tirst heavy windstorm that
strikes it. While washes of different
kinds are good in their way, we lia\e
found nothing so sure as a close ex-
amination of each tree with a sharp
jackknife. A careful scraping of the
earth from the trunk to an inch or
more below the surface will show at
once if borers are at work. If the
bark shows green aud linn all the way
round and there are no evidences of
the sawdust like excreta, it is pretty
conclusive proof that there are 110 bor-
ers at work. At found, they should In-
cut out and killed. A sharpened slen-
der twig will often reach them It they
are bedded deep iu tlie bark. Grass
and weeds should be kept hoed from
the trunks of the trees, so as to leave
a clean spot about two feet in diam-
eter.
For the first five years and longer, it
the trees do not Interfere, crops should
lie grown among the trees—benus, corn
or other crops flint will not seriously
rob the soil, yet which will insure a
thorough cultivation. At eight or nine
years it is well to put the orchard into
clover or alfalfa or other nitrogenous
cover crop. Even under these circum-
stances it should be plowed every third
or fourth year to Ivill out the blue
grass which Is sure to creep in. The
Inst crop or growth of the season
should be allowed to stand to serve as
a catch for the snow, which will pro-
tect the roots of the trees. As winter
conies on precautions must lie taken to
protect the trees front the mice and
rabbits, wire screening or wood shields
being most frequently used. Keep all !
stock out of the orchard.
SWEARINGEN
o. ■,(-i(\c<1-wwit0<50qo ooooooo oooq a1-05OOOOOOOOOOO ooioooo OOCflB
U. C. Guss, President
Kobt.Sjhlberur, Cashier
Frank Dale. V-President J. W. Perry, V-Presldant
H. W. Painter, N. Melville Cartor. Aa3iiU.it Cashier!
Guthrie National Bank
OLDEST BANK IN OKLAHOMA.
GUTHRIE,
$150,000,00
OKLAHOMA
U. C Gusa
Frank Dale
J. W 1'erry
DIRECTORS.
A. J. Seay
G A. Hughes
A. G- C. liierer
ITenry E. Asp
H. VV. Painter
Robert Sohlbersr
NpO")ti VPMade on Cloudy Days as
a3 when the aun shines.
OppositePostoffice, Guthrie, Oklahoma
RAILROAD TIME TABLES-
ATCHISON TOPEKA & SANTA FE
!5:35 a
8:50 a. m.
4:45 p. m.
(11:15 a. m,
South •! 2:20 p. m,
(10:45 p. m.
Local freight north departs .6:00 a. m.
EASTKRN OKLAHOMA BRANCH
Double daily service has now been
established on the E. & O. Branch
which will give through connections for
Shawnee and points North on the new-
line to Newkirk.
Train 412 leaves Guthrie 11:25,
arrives at Shawnee. . . 3:20, p. m.
" Stillwater 12:35, p. m.
•' Glencoe 3:50, p. m.
" Pawnee 4.19, p. m.
" Skeede . 4:40, p. m.
" Ralston 5:02, p. m.
" Kaw 6:07, p. m.
Train 410 leaves Guthrie 5:00, p. m.
arrives at Stillwater... 7:00, p. m.
" Glencoe 7:30, p. m.
" Pawnee 7:55, p. ni.
" Skeede 8:20, p. m.
Trains arrive in Guthrie 8:40 a. m.
" 4:30p. m.
GUTHRIE AND WESTERN BRANCH
Train 145 Haves Guthrie at 8:00 a. m.
Arrives in Kingfisher 10:30 p. m.
Train 146 leaves Kingfisher 11:30 a. m.
Arrive in Guthrie 2:00 p. m.
FORT SMITH AND WESTERN.
Trains arrives at Guthrie 11:00 a. m.
" " " 6:30 p.m.
Leave Guthrie 9:15 a. m.
" " 3:30 p. m.
DENVER. ENID & GULF
PASSENGER
oooo o:ooo:C*oo ooo-^oaoooooooo oooo 0O.O0D0O c*>:<s:.voo«oi ss«
W MBRONSCN L C BRONSON
BRONSON & BRONSON.
Abstracts, Loans and Insurance
Oldest and Largest Insurance Agency in Oklahoma
Fire and Tornado Insurance. Only complete and correct Abstract
Books inLogan county, 20 years' experience in compiling-Abstracts
of Title. Money to loan at lowest rates on farm and city property.
Black Block U8 W. Oklahoma Ave.
Holidays are over, let us clean up your
Curtains and Carpets
GUTHRIE LAUNDRY CO.
Phone 100 R 502- 504 West Oklahoma
Nj
Leave Guthrie
Arrive Cherokee
Leave Cherokee
Arrive, Guthrie
Mixed
Leave Guthrie
Arrive Enid
Leave Enid
Arrive Guthrie
.. . 7:00 a. m.
...11:2S a. m.
.... 12:10p. m.
4:23 p. m.
1:50 p. m.
6:20 p. m.
7:00 a. m.
10:50 a. m.
McAlester,
Canon City
VVier City,
Piedmont,
riontreal,
Anthracite,
COAL!
j. B. FAIRFIELD,
TRANSFER, COAL and STORAGEJ
Established 1S89.
Office and Yards: 407 W. Harrison Ave,
PHONE NO. 20- EAST OF DEPOT
FRISCO LINE
PASSENGER
Trains leave Guthrie
Trains a rive at Guthrie....
LOCAL
Leave Guthrie
Arrive "
MISSOURI, KANSAS & TEXAS
No. 566 mixad train Leaves Guthrie
7:50 a. m.
Arr at Oklahoma City 10:30 a. m.
No. 106 Pass, leaves Guthrie 10:55 a. m.
Arrives at St Louis 7:50 a. m.
No. 103 Pass, leaves Guthrie 2:40 p. m.
Arr in Oklahoma City.. . 5:20 p. m.
No. 110 Pass, leaves Guthrie7:35 p. in.
Arr in Kansas City.._ 8:40 a. m.
No. 565 mixed train leaves Ok-
lahoma City 7:30 p. m.
Arrives in Guthrie..... 10:25 p. ni.
No. 103 Pass, leaves Kansas
City 9:00 p. m.
Arrives in Guthrie 10126 a. m.
No. 107 Pass leaves Oklahoma
City 10:40 a. m.
Arrives in Guthrie .1:15 p. m.
No. 109 Pass, leaves St. Louis 8:32 p. m.
Arrives in Guthrie 5:15 p. m.
ST. LOUIS, EL RENO & WESTERN
KILL the
and cur£ the LUNCS j
< *««*«* «****«***«******* «
I * i
3
WITH
FOR C
ONSUMPTION
OUGHS and
OLDS
Price
50c &$1.00
Free Trial.
Surest and Quickest Cure for all
THROAT and LUNG TROUB- |
LES, or MONEY BACK.
patterson
Furniture
Wbo!e*i;<
mill
Retail
Plain and Artistic
Furniture,
Carpets, Etc.
Emhalmers iao-iaj harrison Avi.
and Funeral Directors. Guthrie.
Residence Phone 184. Phone 8 6j.{
1
1 At*************************
3:30 p. m
9:30 a. m.
9:3o a. m.
8:3o p. m.
Arrives at Guthrie
Leaves Guthrie
Arrives at El Reno
Leaves El Reno
MIXED
Leaves Guthrie at
Arrives El Reno at
Leaves El Reno at
Arrives Guthrie at
NEW REPAIR SHOP
Guns and Bicycles::: Cigars and Tobacco
Will make Keys on Short Notice
Call and Sec Mo. A. V. McWETHY Olsmith Arms C«
107 S. First St., Guthrie, Qkla.
lie ilact inn
. 8 45 a. m.
,5 15 p. m.
.7 00 p. m.
. 6 55 a. m.
.. 9 15 a.m
. 11 45 a.m
... 2 00 p.m
4 30 p.m
FRENCH FEMALE
PPLlLS.
A S*r*. r*r.ta!N Relic* for ' ivt-.k-kd Min-tp.catiow.
Bstlf/ass." T,°
for II .00 |«er box. Will
I them 011 trial,to l"' i f '
i. Samples Krf . If j-ur druggUl doos not
have thorn sc:. I jour order* to tin
UNITIO MEDICAL CO., SOX 74, i.*NC*STC«. P*
Sold in* Guthrie byC. K. Renin
DR.COE'S
SANITARIUM.
LOCATED AT MT*
liurn
III
til
perfect varieties
e whose blossmi
I'm mid pistils. \V
mark nl>ly thrift*
of agriculture. Tlie plrni consists of
• learl ; 1 id liuriiljiR of lire lines
from -i i 3,000 feet in width to hit
fs l,nM' lit.es from which to Unlit l"
8ili! west fires, organizing it pair
Dree ti ouses for the storiitfe of Hi
JiglillnK tools, erecting telephones to
Bummou nlil iind oilier similar meas-
ures. So successful was this plan us a
preventive of fires tliat the sanio com-
jinny Is planning lo extend It to an ad
Uitloual 120,000 acres In southern Ore-
gou. This nicely illustrates oue tif
<ho many lines of service rendered tli<-
commercial interests of tin* country by
itho agricultural department.
ire best namely,
. bear both sta-
• have known of
beds, from the
loin,
standpoint of foliage and bio:
which dl<l not produce a berry, the re-
sult being simply due to tlie fact that
the blossom was Imperfect, needing
fertilization from other stainlnale or
perfect plants. The rows should be
at tout three and a lialf feet apart and
the plants set two and a half feel
apart In the row. Give the beds tlior
ough cultivation anil keep free from
weeds. It Is considered best lo pinch
the blossoms otT the first season, which
reAUlts hi a somewhat more thrifty
plant. A bed cared for iu this manner
will next season furnish an abundance
of tine and luscious fruit.
TOO MICH HOPE.
A friend of ours lost a tine Jersey
cow the other day—tied her too long.
She got tangled up in the rope and
broke her neck—a case of too much
rope. IIow many Instances there nr
in life that nre counterparts of ti:#
above! The cherished of our hearts,
our own flesli anil bone, are often al
lowed to gradually slip away from us
and out from under our control, all be
cause we love them so much ami hate
to restrict their pleasure or say "no" to
them. They are out a little bit late, but
they nre our boys and girls, nnd they
will be nil right. Perhaps later on It
Is the public dance, n case of beer and
a game of cards with a ten cent ante,
anil (he llrst thing we know all is lost,
and we awake to the realization of I lie
fact, only too late, lhat It was just like
our friend's cow a case of too much
rope. Be boys and girls with your boys
nnd girls nnd at the same time be man-
ly men and womanly women, and your
boys and girls will grow up like you,
be proud of you nnd you of theui.
New Daily
%)
Train Service
Mr. Mosey—Ah, my lad, I fear you'r«
going to ubsent yourself from your
scholastic duties this morning—
Willie—Gee! ' You're n reg'lar Shy-
lock Holmes! How'd you ever guea«
it?—Chicago American.
Best INVALID'S HOME in the West.
Organized wltb a full utaft of physicians ana
Surgeons for treatment of all Chronic Diseases.
s)* I thirjy rooms for accommodation of patients,
f, 1 > Difficult Surgical Oftraiiont Pi rfor nnd ivitk
j p r 11 n 11| n * ibkiil and Suuets wh,n Suri,rris. "
j olhLo ftNU
Missouri, Kansas &
Texas Railway Co,
EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 4,'06
KANSAS CITY TRAIN
Leaves Guthrie 7 33 p. m., arrive
Kansas City 840 a.m., carrying a
through cnair car.
ST. LOUIS
Leaves Guthrie 1
in St. Louis 7 50 ;
SEAL
SEAL
SEAL
diseases of women
to treat
of women. Man]
curcd at home- i
who have suffered for years
pedal book for women FREE
IJff PERMANENT CURE
jl x ijifjicl Positively Quarantico
Without kni/t, liratun or cmusttc. A'# tnonif
mcctfttd until /mtient ii well. 6p«Clxl Book FBII.
i uiDinnno c cur*< in t««
1 iflnluUuLLw, Day. under a PosIUt*
f Guarantee. Send for Special FREK Book.
1 New restorative treatment for loss of Vital
{ i Power, Hydrocele, Rupture, Stricture, eto.
1 CRIPPLED CHILDREN
.• methods. Trained attendants.
J WRITE FOR PR1E BOOK CN
.. , r* 1 Olub Peet,Curvature of| Lung, Eye, Skits,
These prices are for SEALS } 1 Spine, Hare Lip, I Kidtey, Bladder,
\ delivered to any postoffice or ox- j ffomlichTrVu'bleV | N^TouVoKauei.
• press office in Oklahoma. We | 1 p ttenu succesifujlr treated at home kjr
can furnish anything in plaih or j 1
nnd act- <•
\ vilufcule InlormaUoB. Call ui offlca or writs to
00
2 50
3 00
TRAIN
155 a. m arrive
, m., carrying a
automatic, self-inking
ing RUBBER STAMPS.
Write for prices on what you
want to the
mall. Canaultatlon Free and confidential, at
oalce or by letter. Thirty Tear,' eipurlenoa.
(ID P II PflC OFHOt, its W*L«UT 8T„
'Jn. (1, m. UUt, KAN3A8 CITY, MO.
through chdir car.
OKLAHOMA CITY TRAIN
Leave) Guthrie 75o a. m., arrives
Oklshonia Cit p. m.
All trains leave from Union
Station.
Oklahoma
Printing Co.
; GUTHRIE OKI.A j
j 105*7 North First St. i
I d
REI5TLE5 PLATES ARE RIGHT
REI5TLE5 RATES ARE RIGHT
FRANK REISTLE
ENGRAVER AND ELECTROTYPER
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Golobie, John. Oklahoma State Register. (Guthrie, Okla.), Vol. 15, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 22, 1906, newspaper, March 22, 1906; Guthrie, Oklahoma. (https://gateway.okhistory.org/ark:/67531/metadc111335/m1/6/ocr/: accessed May 7, 2021), The Gateway to Oklahoma History, https://gateway.okhistory.org; crediting Oklahoma Historical Society.

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